Mouthpiece matters to me.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by cb5270, Jan 28, 2016.

  1. cb5270

    cb5270 Pianissimo User

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    I have read several times that a good trumpeter can get the job done with any reasonable mouthpiece. So I have just proven what a hack I am. I misplaced my faithful Curry 3C dot (Don't ask). To get on with some practice I grabbed a Bach 3C I have and started with my regular routine of soft longtones from Schlossberg 7. By the time I finished 3 of the 4 lines I felt unusual fatigue and was not holding the notes quite as long. Definitely feeling the sharper rim. So I stopped and later retrieved my Curry. Now things are good (relatively) again. If you find a mp that works for you, don't be in a rush to search for a different one.
     
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  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that you misunderstand the notion that a good player can "get the job done" on a broad range of hardware. We are creatures of habit and those that stick with specific horns and mouthpieces have the most consistent results.

    I think that you agree, the Bach 3C would have worked for a performance, even without optimal comfort.

    Important in my opinion is that you noticed the different rim shape. Please reflect if the real issue could have been mouthpiece pressure. Reducing that would make playing your Curry also better!
     
  3. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    A good trumpeter can make just about any equipment (within reason) sound good. To me, the better the horn and the better you get along with any given mouthpiece, the EASIER it is to sound good and have good endurance.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    True story! I was never a more accurate, consistent player than I was when I played virtually everything on the same trumpet/mouthpiece combination - at the time a ML 37 Bach Strad, and a Marckinkiewicz #2. Didn't mean I couldn't play other things, but that was THE setup that worked for me because it was what I used 98% of the time.
     
  5. feedback@stomvi-usa

    [email protected] Piano User

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    We believe that there is an awful lot of really good equipment out there.
    We also believe in optimizing your equipment for you.


    Best,

    Jon
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I certainly never have liked a Bach 7C mouthpiece, but I can make them work like they should, as I do with a student who is also using one. Just generally I favor a 5C, just as I favor a 6.5 AL for my euph instead of a 12 C. This is me, and you can like what you like.

    Life always seems easier when you do and use what you like, but the question lays dormant of whether you still can achieve, when your tools aren't satisfactory and you don't yet have the recognized skills. Look back, this is how you got to where you are now. Yep, I've no doubt many once had a Bundy or equal and 7C. Yep, it seems logical that such was a factor that many did not continue and are among us here now.
     
  7. cb5270

    cb5270 Pianissimo User

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    Of course I would have made the 3C work if there was no chance of retrieving the Curry. With some time I would have adapted to the Bach 3C to some extent. Took 2 weeks to get the Curry where I wanted to be, coming from a Bach 7C. The tone I was getting and the comfort kept me motivated.

    That particular exercise only is written to a fourth space E (sometimes I modify it to go to G) and I concentrate on using little pressure, but with the clumsy feeling I had I probably was trying to compensate in some way with some pressure. Maybe I'll go back and try it again and watch for pressure.

    And thanks ROWUK for all I have learned from your posts. Simple truths, no gimmicks.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The reason that I mention it is because this is not the first time someone has mentioned it. Sharper rims give our tone additional clarity but can limit flexibility if we use excessive pressure. I am not advocating a switch, check for pressure with your Curry. The less you need, the better it gets!

     
  9. larry newman

    larry newman Piano User

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    Just as a better tennis player can beat you using your racket.

    And a better trumpet player can make your horn/mp sound like something else entirely.

    There's the right equipment, and there's transcending the equipment. I'll bet the good players are not having this conversation, just us guys always looking for improvement, but not always in the right places.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I completely agree with that, and in the last decade or so, I've really come to understand how important dialing your equipment in for certain types of playing can be too. Just the same, even the best equipment doesn't play itself - it's always seemed to me that there's a certain amount of "dialing in" or adapting oneself to their equipment in the practice room that has to occur to maximize efficiency, accuracy and consistency.
     

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