mouthpiece placement(reducing variables)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by wnaus, Jan 4, 2009.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    This is no voodoo. Just stop for a minute and think about how many thousandths of an inch difference a Bach 1C, 1 1/4C and 1 1/2C rim and cup have. Think about the microscopic difference between a ML and a large bore horn bore size. Think about the miniscule difference a valve alignment represents. What about the small differences in your tuning slide to get "comfortable?

    All of these things are in the same geometrical ball park as aligning the mouthpiece in the receiver.

    Before doing this, make sure that the receiver and shank are really clean. Dirt and other crud can affect the mechanical coupling. Optimally, the shank should be lapped into the receiver until the gap is right.

    The beauty of this tweak is that it is FREE, does not waste practice time and is repeatable. keep in mind that if you remove the mouthpiece from the horn when it goes into the case, the shank will wear and you may need to recalibrate after a year or two.

    My take on this tweak is that it is not airflow, rather the mechanical coupling of the mouthpiece to the horn. Any slight out of roundness will dramatically reduce the coupling. There will be a sweet spot and when you find it, the horn should react more consistently, stable, focussed....

    Thanks Wayne!
     
  2. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    A mouthpiece is normally made in a lathe.
    The working piece has to be turned when making the mouthpiece (rim/cup – backbore/shaft).
    If the center of the clamping chuck is just i.e. 1/1000 out of alignment with the center,
    you can in worst case get the backbore/shaft and rim/cup 2/1000 out of alignment etc etc.
    This means that the mpc’s rim/cup acts like an eccentric ring when you turn it.
    So yes, this could probably affect the “sweet pointâ€.
    If your mpc receiver is out of center alignment, this will increase a negative effect.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2009
  3. BobList

    BobList New Friend

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    I've never clocked a piece intentionally, but if I'm having an exceptional night of playing, I WILL look and see where the name is on the piece.... I'll put it in thay way every time, you know, just in case....

    Bob
     
  4. wnaus

    wnaus Pianissimo User

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    Maybe what we're talking about is no different than baseball players when they adjust their gloves over and over or any other "ritual" that gets them through the game.I like to align trumpet playing to a baseball pitcher trying to throw a 95 mile an hour ball. Every part of the engine must be functioning at optimum efficiency. Playing trumpet and throwing a 90 mph ball are similar in that it is a mind/body discipline to the max. Thats what makes sports and music so similar, the mind/body connection. Nothing is more difficult!!!!
    WN
     
  5. wnaus

    wnaus Pianissimo User

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    Good point!
    WN
     
  6. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    I've done this on a relatively top-end Getzen and Monette B6 combination - and it works. Remember the receiver is soldered onto the leadpipe (not necessarilly straight), and the leadpipe is probably extruded (not necessarilly concentrically), and the MP external taper may have been turned with a different machine set-up to machining the backbore, because the MP would need to be "flipped" in the chuck (lack of concentricity and alignment) - so all in all, it makes sense that clocking will potentially improve your outcome.

    My only problem here is that, if clocking has an impact then why do we not concentrate on directing the airstream straight down the backbore - yes I recognise ROWUK's argument about the cup providing a choke point or pressure accumulator, but from an engineering perspective I'm puzzled that directing airsteams straight down the bore is seen as not being an ideal anyhow. Any thoughts?
     
  7. wnaus

    wnaus Pianissimo User

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    I am able to feel a centering of the air into the MP but how do you feel it directed into the backbore?
    WN
     
  8. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Well, if you buzz (maybe just blowing {with a whistle embouchure} works best) into the mouthpiece and place your hand behind the backbore, I think you can actually feel the airstream moving around as you vary the angle of the airflow down the throat - you can get some mouthpieces to whistle at a relatively low frequency when you get the flow "right-on" centre (center). I'm still searching for the real answer here because ROWUK suggests that this is all an assumption on my part (paraphrasing what I think he said). Bottom line though, I find that I get a much better tone when I get my airflow centered - and Heaven knows, I need all the help I can get, and I'm surely no expert.

    I have to always question what I KNOW to be true - after all, before 1492 the world knew that America didn't exist, before Copernicus (if my history is correct) the Universe revolved around the Earth - and we used to KNOW that the Earth was flat (some of us still think it is.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2009
  9. oldlips48

    oldlips48 Piano User

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    Ted, your in Australia. Your world IS flat :)
     
  10. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Yes Old Lips, not much in the way of mountains in the "Great Brown Land" - 7200 ft is about as high as it goes - we do have snowfields greater in area than Switzerland though - but as you say, we make up for lack of height - with plenty of flat. ROFL
     

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