Mouthpiece Pressure

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetaddict, Feb 21, 2011.

  1. trumpetaddict

    trumpetaddict New Friend

    41
    0
    Sep 3, 2010
    Am I using to much m-piece pressure if i have a small indention in my bottom lip from my teeth after playing for a few hours?
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,113
    9,264
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    First a few questions:
    1. How many days, months, years have you been playing on this mouthpiece @ a few hours per day?
    2. Have you tried playing only for and hour? If so, what did you notice then?
    3. Does it hurt?
    4. Do you wear braces?
     
  3. Octiceps

    Octiceps Pianissimo User

    114
    0
    May 5, 2010
    San Jose, CA
  4. trumpetaddict

    trumpetaddict New Friend

    41
    0
    Sep 3, 2010
    I'm currently using a gold plated Schilke 15C4. Ive been playing on it for about two months so far. The indention doesnt hurt but i can feel it i rub my tongue across it and i just got some braces removed about five months ago.
     
  5. JoeyK1

    JoeyK1 New Friend

    23
    0
    Feb 12, 2011
    I don't use much pressure, and I get an indentation on the inside of my upper lip... Huh...
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,113
    9,264
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    In response to your initial post, this quote and the response below you were their experience is that pressure does not matter, pressure may not be the problem.

    From what you describe, it sounds like it may be a wear pattern, in which there is movement at the base of your embouchure when you play, leading to an irritation to the mucosal membrane.

    Do you notice a lot of movement, or are you frequently changing the position of the mouthpiece on your lips as you slur or change range? This would cause a wear pattern.

    But more likely, the mouthpiece does not fit well to your embouchure. Have you tried sampling other mouth pieces for ease of performance? I would recommend giving this a try first and soon. If the indentation remains, you should see your dentist for their impressions as well.
     
  7. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

    2,776
    1,903
    Oct 19, 2008
    Flinders Vic Australia
    IMO if you are getting an impression of your teeth on the inside of you lips and it goes away after you rest for a while then you ARE using too much pressure wether you think so or not.

    I have been there and it is not easy to counteract, long soft and relaxed low notes as suggested above are what fixed me.

    We have a player in our big band who claims to be a no pressure player but after playing above the stave has an impression of the mouthpiece rim on his lips when he stops.

    A mouthpiece safari may help but I dont think that is the answer.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,952
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    No.
    Maximum pressure allowed changes with experience. When we are young and indestructable, we use pressure to accomplish things that we don't have quite enough muscles for. As we get older, we have an opportunity to play smarter and accomplish more because of an approach with less testosterone.

    If you can play all of the music that is on your stand in a concert, and still have enough chops for a great encore, you are doing just fine. If you crap out in the middle somewhere, then you need to be concerned.

    DO NOT THINK ABOUT CHANGING ANYTHING DURING PLAYING SEASON!!!! If you are convinced that you need to fix something, wait until the summer when you have time.
     
  9. trumpetaddict

    trumpetaddict New Friend

    41
    0
    Sep 3, 2010
    The indentation goes away after a couple of hours and my chops usually for about three hours until I can no longer make a sound.
     
  10. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

    1,189
    84
    Aug 9, 2007
    Levittown , NY
    It could be too much pressure. Most players who use excessive pressure in the upper register,also do so in the middle and low registers.

    Age or amount of years on the horn has nothing to do with it,too much pressure is too much pressure, and it's never too early to correct. A bad habit is a bad habit,and the longer you play doing it ,the longer and harder it is to undo.

    It doesn't take that long if you practice everything at a pp or p level with very little pressure.
     

Share This Page