Mouthpiece question from comeback player

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mambo King, Nov 12, 2009.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    JD,
    it is I that has to be a bit clearer. I don't always catch the nuance.

    In any case, I find many of the claims AMAZING because they do not line up my experiences in over 30 years of teaching, or the thought of so many child prodigies out there - that I have never had the priviledge of working with................ ;-)

    I try not to use myself as an example. That only counts on stage or in a rehearsal.
     
  2. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Aug 9, 2007
    Levittown , NY
    The poster was asking about keeping the same rim size, but trying a shallower cup, so as usual everyone said no don't do it, it's you not your equipment, but if he wanted to go deeper, the same people would have had plenty of mouthpiece recommendations, not everyone is going to perform with a symphony orchestra.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2009
  3. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    Interesting observation -- when a person moves to a deeper cup, the player has to do more of the work. When a person moves to a shallower cup, the mouthpiece itself does some of the work of restricting the ability of the lips to vibrate and pushes them together more tightly, making it easier to achieve a higher frequency vibration.

    Some of us feel that the player should be doing more of the work, regardless of the playing situation. Some of us feel it's alright to let the equipment take over some of the work.

    There's really no right or wrong in any of this other than that it's right if our equipment allows us to get the endurance we want with the range we want with the comfort level we want with the tone we want with the flexibility we want. Notice that I said "we want" and not "we need" because I am assuming (perhaps wrongly) that we are all wanting what we need for the playing situation we either have currently or hope to have in the future.

    There's a reason that all these different mouthpieces of varying rim shapes and sizes and varying cup shapes and sizes and depths and all varying backbores -- they're all great for somebody. People don't put all the work into designing and manufacturing mouthpieces just on the speculation that somebody is going to want to buy them. They've all been specially designed for somebody and then put into production.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Al,
    I firmly believe that there is a time and place for everything. My stand is that until your "standard" playing is at least reasonably in order, changing things is a big disadvantage.

    This poster admits to not even having the basics down but wants to play "prolonged high".

    This to me is a clear case of the cart before the horse.

    I will never recommend a mouthpiece when RANGE is the issue simply because "reasonable" mouthpieces do not help range for weak players. Standard mouthpieces are just fine from low F# to high C, D and E. Once we have that stabilized, then we can start looking at matching the sound to the job.

    At 15 or 16 when I first started playing big band, I used a Bach 1 1/2C for concert band and a 10 1/2C for lead. At 18 I switched to a Schilke 18 and a 14A4A. I already had the range but just wanted some more sparkle. I was not able to just switch back and forth at first. My chops fell into the cup of the 14A4A. I needed a week of practice and then it worked. I had a 14B when I needed to switch on short notice.

    At 53, I have trouble with the 14A4A as even a week is not enough to get used to it anymore. Dave Monette made me a mouthpiece about the size and depth of a 7C, but with a lot more sizzle.

    So, my point is: first things first. Range is stupid without decent chops and the musical concept to match. Impatience is the beginning of chaos. There are no hardware shortcuts. Specialty mouthpieces become important once the mechanics are under control.
     
  5. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Aug 9, 2007
    Levittown , NY
    rowuk,while I agree with you that there are no hardware shortcuts, the point I was trying to make was ,why is a cup shallower than a C, or a diameter smaller than a 7 considered a specialty mouthpiece ,but a 1C isn't? The work I do is exclusively big band work , and no one in any of the bands I've worked in, played on a 1 or a 1 1/2, and this poster said he played a 1CW, so I would call this a specialty piece.
    I do have my students start on a midsized piece , preferably a 7C ,I haven't played with an orchestra in over 40 years, and I did play Bach #1 back then, when I got into commercial and big band playing ,was when I switched equipment for sound and ease of playing,used two Jet Tones for 25 years, at 59 I use a Warburton 6SV with a 3 back bore , which is close to a 7 in diameter.
     
  6. jtarpley

    jtarpley New Friend

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    Nov 11, 2009
    Atlanta
    Wow, ROWUK: GREAT POST!! Well said, good advice.
     

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