Mouthpiece & Receiver

Discussion in 'Trumpet Repair and Modification' started by Beau Kemp, Nov 8, 2005.

  1. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Brian, I think that the needle nose pliers method involves inserting them into the shank when they are closed and then twisted, thus allowing the taper of the nose of the pliers to re-round the dented shank. Also, the mouthpiece tool with the 'T' handle is designed to be inserted and twisted - not tapped with a rawhide mallet.
     
  2. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Damaged mouthpiece shanks

    For many years I have used a large machinists center punch with a taper to the point that has a hexagonal shaft and I polished the taper by spinning it in either a machinists lathe or, a drill press, while polishing with fine crocus cloth,( a fine abrasive coated fabric ). The greased punch is gently inserted into the shank of the mouthpiece and rotated while gently pushing it deeper. It works a treat. The shank ends up looking just like new.

    OLDLOU>>
     
  3. gregc

    gregc Mezzo Piano User

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    Apr 5, 2004
    New York, U.S. of A.
    Yea, anything with a tapered nose will work, pliers, plumb-bob, center punch. Brass is soft, so go EZ, and stop before you go 'too far'.
    greg
     
  4. brian moon

    brian moon Forte User

    I see what you mean about the pliers. I pictured someone using it differently.

    The T handle mouthpiece tool won't fix a badly dented shank. You need a mallet.
     
  5. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Grand Rapids, Mi.
    A Mallet????????

    I once saw this done with the mentioned tool and a mallet. It split the tube of the shank so badly that the mouthpiece was scrap. This was on an almost brand new Bach 7C mouthoiece. I have yet to find any dented shank mouthpiece that I couldn't swell back out with the taper of my punch, and, ZERO DAMAGE. Heating the mouth of the shank with a torch to red, then, quickly plunging it into water will anneal the brass to a workable softness, making the process much safer and simpler. Most mouthpieces are turned from brass bar stock which is usually quite brittle after machining.

    OLDLOU>>
     
  6. Billy B

    Billy B Pianissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2004
    Des Moines, IA
    A French horn mouthpiece works well.
     

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