mouthpiece selection

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by WHISTLEPIGSBAND, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. WHISTLEPIGSBAND

    WHISTLEPIGSBAND New Friend

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    Jan 20, 2009
    i currently play a jet tone dsa piece. think its a copy of docs piece when he played it back in the day. anyway its basically a 7c size piece with a really flat rim with a sharp inside edge which i really like. qestion is that i have some trouble playing in the low register. its iffy at best on a low g unless i stop playing and just play it. not reliable say on a trumpet solo that goes down there. i have drilled the throat out to 22 which helped a little. i have played on a bigger piece that does help get down there. a bach 1 with a 22 throat. but it limits my endurance. could never play it on a gig. i play 3 & 4 hour gigs in a rock band & play well above high c all nite long. i dont think its a piece problem since i have probably owned 50 different pieces. the big ones work low but there goes the endurance. range is there on wutever i play on. i would like to be one of those players that can play from the bottom to the top of the horn consistently. maybe i need to play on 2 or 3 different size pieces. although i dont like that idea. the best players dont switch back and forth. they play on one piece for everything and can play pedals and double c. any advice?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Whistlepigsband,
    you are asking for a hardware solution to a software problem. Most pros that I know and work with do not play everything from pedals to double c-with any mouthpiece. They pick mouthpieces that give them the sound that they need to do the job at hand. If they play lead in a big band, the mouthpiece helps them get more edge on there sound, if it is a symphony orchestra, a broad, well projecting sound is more favorable. If you play all types of music, you will simply need to prepare what is coming up next. That is what I have done for the last 40+ years.

    If you have trouble with consistency, it is not the mouthpiece or horn, it is your attitude about practicing things that are good for you. If half of what you claim is true (I can't tell as I do not know you, but indications of exaggeration are in your post), you already know the answer. My recommendation is always the same: a daily routine consisting of long tones and slurs played at pianissimo (or even softer), then some easy tunes, and finally technical exercizes.
     
  3. scottlashbrook

    scottlashbrook New Friend

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    Jan 2, 2009
    London UK
    "the best players dont switch back and forth. they play on one piece for everything and can play pedals and double c. any advice?[/quote]"

    Don't believe it!

    (would you go jogging in a pair of steel tow cap boots, or work on a construction site in a pair of ballet shoes?)

    Use the right kit for the right job, but you should be able to play from low F# (and pedals) up to at least a double G on all your pieces.

    Try two octave slurs with a click track, and gradually speed them up.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    "

    Don't believe it!

    (would you go jogging in a pair of steel tow cap boots, or work on a construction site in a pair of ballet shoes?)

    Use the right kit for the right job, but you should be able to play from low F# (and pedals) up to at least a double G on all your pieces.

    Try two octave slurs with a click track, and gradually speed them up.[/QUOTE]

    Double G? That would be G above double C and only available to the specialist. With that a 4 octave slur would be reality. I prefer to concentrate on the range that I need for the job at hand. I have never needed anything above a double C.
     
  5. WHISTLEPIGSBAND

    WHISTLEPIGSBAND New Friend

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    Jan 20, 2009
    this is to rowuk? im new on this site and evedently you dont believe wut ihav posted. im not on here to lie. im not on here to sell anything. i thought i could come on here and have an informative discussion bout trumpet. your last coment kinda turned me off. i am a semi pro player. i play with the 2 bands i play in without any issues. im just looking for outside opinions and ideas to help me and anyone else that might have similar issues
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome to TM, WHISTLEPIGSBAND!

    It might be your horn that is at fault with the low notes. Some otherwise great trumpets can be unresponsive below the staff. If it isn't your horn, then the following Farkas exercise can open up the lower register:

    Tongue and crescendo slow quarter notes starting on low c, going to fff or so, and proceed down chromatically.

    After a while you should be able to bark out low F#'s, and it seems to be one of those bicycle riding skills that we don't unlearn.

    Good luck, and have fun!
     
  7. BergeronWannabe

    BergeronWannabe Piano User

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    Feb 6, 2007
    GR Mouthpieces
    Brian will answer any questions you might have.
    -Andrew
     
  8. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    Levittown , NY
    If you want to play high practice high if you want to play low practice low, Clarke's Technical studies are excellent for covering the horn's range from bottom to top.
     
  9. WHISTLEPIGSBAND

    WHISTLEPIGSBAND New Friend

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    Jan 20, 2009
    to rowuk again. evidently we are not on the same page. a double g is g above high c. another words, a note that is 4 ledger lines above the staff. this is not an unusual range for a good player. 3 octaves. evidently the terms for notes are different in germany than in the us
     
  10. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    This comes up all the time.

    I am a professional lead player.

    All the pro players I know use this....

    The "Doubles" START at Double C.

    A "Double G" is ABOVE Double C

    The G under Double C is called G, or high G
     

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