mouthpiece selection

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by WHISTLEPIGSBAND, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. SilverHorn

    SilverHorn Pianissimo User

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Alabama
    This is my understanding of the octaves. The way I was taught MANY years ago.

    You have low C or just C, treble C, high C and double high C. Double high C was Maynards limit I think.
     

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  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    WPB,
    assuming it takes 6 months to get used to a mouthpiece, 50 of them means 25 years.

    Assuming you gig heavily AND pay attention to your body....... You know what you feel like the next day and if that was "healthy", "intelligent" playing.

    My advice stays the same:If you have trouble with consistency, it is not the mouthpiece or horn, it is your attitude about practicing things that are good for you. If half of what you claim is true (I can't tell as I do not know you, but indications of exaggeration are in your post), you already know the answer. My recommendation is always the same: a daily routine consisting of long tones and slurs played at pianissimo (or even softer), then some easy tunes, and finally technical exercizes.

    Only if you are in tune with your body, can you move forward. A daily routine will help you get in tune.

    Maybe the problem is "well above high C all night". Some musical lower notes could give your face a well needed break. My students often discover that testosterone is their worst enemy................
     
  3. soundgrazer

    soundgrazer Pianissimo User

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    Oct 6, 2008
    Montreal
    I do not believe the jet tone is typically one that will produce a "low" range without compromise. But I can say this; some trumpet players DO play everything with one mouthpiece. Practising pedal tones are a great way to strengthen your facial muscles without blowing your chops. I also can vouch for the Clarke studies and old Arban books.
    I think people are really good at what they practise the most.
    BTW , I can't hit Double C; I am only good till G below. Is that a bad thing? It is if I am playing 1st part in big band, so I don't. I will play 2nd and take the improv solos and still wonder if I can find the perfect mouthpiece. In the mean time I am still trying to reach double C WITHOUT injuring myself. In the past I could play double C and guess what? You guessed it, I blew too many of those and blew my chops and it took me 6 months to get them back. Don't bugger around with mouthpieces too much. Let your technique control your playing. Make only gradual changes. Good luck.

    I think perhaps you are going through the old search for the "perfect mouthpiece"; it does not exist.
     
  4. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    All I know is that Al Hirt had a great low G using a small jet tone.
     
  5. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    Apr 5, 2008
    Norway
    "7c size piece with a really flat rim with a sharp inside edge"

    A flat rimmed mp with sharp inside edges is like a wise which helps you to
    “lock†your embouchure especially when playing in the high registers.
    It doesn’t allow you to move your lips much inside the rim. As you say, the low G sounds “iffyâ€
    unless you stop playing and just play it. This means that you have to adjust (“unlockâ€)
    your embouchure to hit it clean.
    You could test this out yourself by using a mp with more rounded rim and less bite,
    just to see if this helps in the lower registers.
    The danger is that you might lose parts of your upper register. (For a while)...
     
  6. et_mike

    et_mike Mezzo Forte User

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    I have a quadruple C that I can play for hours a day... but I suffer from a lack of musicality.... please help....

    but beware, if any of you try to correct me or give an answer I don't like... I will call you out and attack you!!
     
  7. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    Freestyle ROFL
     
  8. WHISTLEPIGSBAND

    WHISTLEPIGSBAND New Friend

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    Jan 20, 2009
    i guess it mus be a trumpet thing. f# below the staff is low f#. f# in the staffjust above the first line is f#. f# on the top line of the staff is high F#. f# that is 3 ledgers above the staff is the start of double high anything. go past double high c to the next f#. and u hav come to triple f#. your other intrepretations of this make no sense to me. anyway, i really dont care. i have posted 3 questions and some of the answers that i have gotten seem to be very helpful. playin for 35 years and its never to late to learn somthing new. thanks.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Nope,
    octaves in the states and everywhere else starts on C. That has never been different and never will be. That is the universal page.

    In Germany, we call the C above the staff C3 and double C C4. Even here the name sticks starting with C, G an octave above the staff is G3.
     
  10. WHISTLEPIGSBAND

    WHISTLEPIGSBAND New Friend

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    Jan 20, 2009
    correct. the terms double and triple are "slang" terms. these terms start on f# below the staff. at least that wut i have been taught.
     

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