Mouthpiece trouble!!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ca5tr0, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. ca5tr0

    ca5tr0 New Friend

    47
    1
    Feb 28, 2010
    Florida
    I love my Schilke, and even though I can play A above high C with it, it is uncomfortable playing it sometimes. I am considering having it gold plated to add some cushion to it. Also thinking about getting a 13A4 and trying that. Maybe a smaller size will bring benefits?? Who knows, but I'm looking for comfort now. On a good day I can play the C above the 4 ledger lines and a space A with the schilke, but that's very rare. The chemistry has to be just right. I find that I can hit the super C when I do a light practice session consisting of long tones, slurs, chromatic scales the day before. I think I'm going to sell the Parduba, because I'm just not feeling it at all. I've only had the schilke for about 13 months. When I switched from a bach 3c to the schilke 14A4, I improved instantly. I truly thought that it was the mouth piece I would stick with for years.
     
  2. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

    2,776
    1,903
    Oct 19, 2008
    Flinders Vic Australia
    The only thing gold plating a mouthpiece will do is lighten your pocket. Some people claim that gold is more slippery than silver, I have found that this may be due to the plater polishing the silver to a high shine prior to plating the gold. I have had several tops and rims plated with gold and feel no difference or detect no difference in playing.

    The usual thickness of gold plating is 4 micron, 1 micron=1/1000 mm or approx .00016".

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,952
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    I just picked a new brunette girlfriend based on some pictures and a letter. Now after I met her, she isn't as friendly as the last one that I had. What should I do???????????????

    ANYONE who doesn't research mouthpieces by playing, gets what they deserve. The anatomy of mouthpieces is not science, it is more luck than anything else. Even if the design is "superior", if the customer is not comfortable, it is a failure.

    I think it is stupid to change mouthpieces during "playing" season. The change can take months, so vacation time often is the only intelligent choice. If you need to keep playing, you often have to twist your face and embouchure to get through - that is asking for trouble.

    Specialty mouthpieces need to be auditioned - a blind date often turns out to be something quite different than we expected.

    Boring out a Schilke mouthpiece destroys its playing capabilities, reduces the efficiency, makes the tone "fuzzier" and screws the tuning up. After playing on something like that for a while, no wonder that a "balanced" mouthpiece is a problem.

    I think that you need professional help. You have dug a pretty deep hole!
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

    6,786
    3,551
    Oct 26, 2003
    Baltimore/DC
    Does anyone else get tired of seeing these kinds of threads?
     
  5. jmberinger

    jmberinger Pianissimo User

    97
    23
    Jun 5, 2007
    Long Beach, California
    If the reason for the change was "discomfort", the resolution is looking into why there was discomfort. So, what is the nature of the discomfort and when does it occur? What type of playing are you doing, with whom are you studing and what did they say?

    When you say there is a range issue, when are you required to play over high "c" and what happenned for the rest of the range? Did the sound quality change in the mid register and/or the low register or is it the same? What tone quality are you looking to achieve and how does this tool get you there?

    Sorry, I got a little carried away, but at the end of the day there is a foundation issue and not just one of "discomfort".
     
    ca5tr0 likes this.
  6. johnande

    johnande Pianissimo User

    148
    42
    Jun 3, 2009
    western Wyoming
    ca5tr0... I recently had an experience similar to yours when I made the transition from a Warburton to a Parduba mpc. My first response to the new Parduba was 1) much better slotting; 2) cleaner attacks; 3) better tone in lower and middle registers; 4) significant loss of upper register range. My loss in upper range was so great, even after a couple of weeks, I called the dealer and arranged a return. The mpc sat on my mantle for a few days until I started to wrap it for return shipping. On a lark I put it on my horn to try it "one more last time." My range had somehow returned after the few days of non-use. Needless to say, I did not return the Parduba and am quite satisfied and still using it.
     
    ca5tr0 likes this.
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,611
    7,952
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    The issue is that every newbie starts in the same place, with the same questions - and the same lack of research or use of the search feature. It is the nature of open internet forums to be asked to be spoon fed.

    It is AMAZING that some players know about boring mouthpieces out before they know about play before you pay...................
     
  8. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

    784
    102
    Sep 25, 2009
    Polson, MT
    I'm sure that if this site had a little better search function we would get a lot fewer duplicate posts.
     
  9. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    A few of questions:
    >Why did you change in the first place?
    >What was it about your old mouthpiece that you didn't like?
    >What is it you are trying to achieve with the new mouthpiece?
    --
     
  10. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    A)rowuk sez: I just picked a new brunette girlfriend based on some pictures and a letter. Now after I met her, she isn't as friendly as the last one that I had. What should I do???????????????
    ----
    B)You picked a hot brunette for conversation purposes?
    We need to have a talk.
    --

    A) ANYONE who doesn't research mouthpieces by playing, gets what they deserve. The anatomy of mouthpieces is not science, it is more luck than anything else. Even if the design is "superior", if the customer is not comfortable, it is a failure.
    ----
    B)Ain't that the truth.
    --
     

Share This Page