mouthpieces

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by manomana, Apr 18, 2010.

  1. manomana

    manomana New Friend

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    Apr 17, 2010
    Hi, In some way or another, I have acquired a Vincent Bach 10 1/2 C trumpet mouthpiece. I was just curious as to it's primary use (apart from playing the trumpet). Is it for jazz, classical or what?
    Thanks,

    Manomana
     
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    7,868
    6,868
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    It's a little smaller diameter to help with high range endurance. I don't believe you'll find too many people using them for classical music, at least on Bb trumpets. I'd say it's more of a big band or concert band mouthpiece, but it's not a bad choice for many people - it's deeper than many think, and you can get a pretty nice tone out of it. Generally speaking, of course, and your mileage may vary...;-)
     
  3. manomana

    manomana New Friend

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    Apr 17, 2010
    Dale,
    Thank you so much for the info. I've used it a little and you're right about the "mileage". I'm new on TM as of yesterday and I really appreciate your quick response.
    Manomana (aka Rafael)
     
  4. Bill Dishman

    Bill Dishman Piano User

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    Nov 22, 2003
    Gainesville, Florida
    Re: mouthpieces 10 1/2 C

    I used the 10 1/2 C with my piccolo for over 30 years even though I use a Bach 1 for normal Bb and C trumpet.

    The smaller rim size and the standard C cup yielded a full tone quality for me.

    Recently switched my piccolo mp to a Bach NY 7C.

    Bill Dishman
    Gainesville, Florida
     
  5. rockya10

    rockya10 New Friend

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    Feb 16, 2010
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Don't know if this is the right place for this post but maybe someone can help with my question. I have a JetTone Studio Model D mouthpiece that I need to know more information about before I put it up for sale. I've had it since the early 70's and never really used it that much. I can't find much information on any of the sites that I've visited so maybe someone here can help. I mainly used this when I wasn't able to play regularly to keep my chops in shape or if I had to do more jazz playing. I normally use a Giardinelli 7C mouthpiece. Can someone tell me what to tell prospective buyers about the advantages or it or what its characteristics are? I know that JetTone is supposed to generally help increase the range but what else?
     
  6. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi manomana,
    In my opinion, you have one of the most comfortable sizes for reaching a complete range. I've played a Bach 10 1/2 C for over 30 years and my experience is:
    It helps me produce a great sound
    I can play classical music with it
    I can solo ( I do a lot of soloing both jazz and classical)
    I can play in the stratosphere (whatever I want)
    I find it to be the general all around best mouthpiece size out there.
    Now days, the hip, in vogue thing these days is to get a big mouthpiece. I've had people to try and get me to play some of those toilet bowel size mouthpieces and I just look at them and say "Why?"
    That always seems to shut them up.
    I've got a case (seriously) of mouthpieces ranging from Monette and asymmetric to ancient HW White mouthpieces and everything in between. I always end back playing the Bach 10 1/2 C.
     
  7. manomana

    manomana New Friend

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    Apr 17, 2010
    Bill,
    Thanks for the info. I don't know how I came by that mouthpiece. Quite possibly it came with the trumpet when I bought it used (a Connstellation long cornet). I appreciate your response.
    Manomana, (aka Rafael)
     
  8. manomana

    manomana New Friend

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    Apr 17, 2010
    Markie,
    Your comments and those of others have made me think that I ought to start using it more. I guess it's like anything new, one is a little uncomfortable with it at first. I do find it a little tiring after playing for a while, but that's simply because I'm not used to it yet. Thanks again for the information.
    Manomana (aka Rafael)
     
  9. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Just an idea:
    Put the mouthpiece in the trumpet and play it a little.
    Then, turn the mouthpiece a quarter turn and play a little.
    Then, another quarter turn and play a little and then another quarter turn and play.
    I'll bet that there will be at least one spot (quarter) on the mouthpiece that seems to feel and play best.
    Put a small magic marker spot on the mouthpiece where it feels best. That way the mouthpiece will go in the trumpet the same everytime.
    Now I know that some people will say "that's a bunch of balony".
    I also know that there are just as many people that will say " My mouthpiece goes in the trumpet the same way everytime." As for me, my mouthpiece goes in the trumpet the same way everytime.
    Hope this helps with the comfort.
     
  10. manomana

    manomana New Friend

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    Apr 17, 2010
    Markie,
    I agree with you. What's more, I've discovered over time that if you turn the mouthpiece slightly, sometimes that makes a diffence in the accuracy of the lower notes, especially low C, C# and D. Maybe it's my trumpets, my method of playing or possibly my imagination, but it does seem to make a difference. It doesn't seem very logical, I'll admit but it works for me.
    Thanks.
    Manomana (aka Rafael)
     

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