Mr. Manny sir could answer a few things? PLZ

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trmpt_chica, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. SamTheMan

    SamTheMan New Friend

    35
    0
    Jun 30, 2005
    hello

    Although I can't say that I have more experience than you at trumpet (I'm a trumpet student as well,) I do have one tip. It may seem like the last thing that will help your range because it's so basic, but LONG TONES are the key! I used to have a very stressed upper register, and I'm still working on it, but I'd have to say that starting practice with some nice long whole notes has improved my playing more than anything else I've done.
     
  2. rjzeller

    rjzeller Forte User

    Age:
    45
    1,207
    0
    Mar 7, 2005
    Rochester, MN
    chica -- wow! The enthusiasm is exploding all over my screen. I love to see someone who's so clearly excited to play the instrument. With such eagerness, I'm sure you'll go far.

    No advice from me on the upper register. Worry about making the best music you can and let the rest take care of itself.

    Regarding scales -- do you have a private teacher? If not, get one. In my experience people learn and retain things differently. I find if I understand how a particular student learns best, and I customize a solution to that ability, they do quite well.

    One thing you can do is play every scale a million times until you've memorized it. (Personally, I think this method sucks but it really does work for some folks).

    Another way is to learn the circle of fifths (NOT memorize -- learn it. Learn how it's derrived and WHY it works the way it does and scales become second nature). This works about 50% of the time for folks (adding the extra info only confuses things for some people).

    There's also pattern recognition -- if you look at the sharp keys, for instance, the key is the note immediately 1/2 step above the last sharp. So if you see 4 sharps, the last sharp in the key signature would be D#, if you go up 1/2 step you're on E. That's the key signature -- E. For the flat keys, you go back to the second-to-last flat and that's your key. So ifyou have two flats -- Bb and Eb, the second to last flat listed is Bb, that's the key. if you have four -- Bb Eb Ab Db -- the key is Ab.

    For me, the approach that seems to work most consistently well for people is to stop treating scales like scales and start treating them like music. Learn to hear the melodic pattern within the scale and play THAT. You'd be suprised at how quickly you could play any major scale starting from any note if you do that. The intervals area always the same, so teh basic SOUND of the scale is always the same. Whole-Whole-half-Whole-Whole-Whole-half. If you can memorize that pattern, and learn to play the scale like music and not like some boring excercise, you'll begin to memorize them without ever trying!

    ***

    Now...marching band. I LOVE MB. I used to teach it for several years. maybe I will again someday, but right now I'm happy to toot my own horn at times and play with the mini-Z's while they're still young. Marching Band is really a mixed bag, though.

    by that I mean you will either have the best experience of your life, or the worst. If you're getting into a good program, you will be amazed at how demanding, challenging, physical, and downright musical it can be. There is an overwhelming sentiment here in Rochester that Marching Bands are not musical. I think it's becuase the local public schools here have no concept of what a MB can or should be. They think it's just play loud and move around a bit. No sense of art. If that's the group you're heading into, don't get your hopes up.

    BUT...if you're heading into a quality group (around MN it's either Irondale, Waseca, or Grand Rapids ... though the local private school has done a bangup job recently as well), the experience is something else. You will learn a discipline that will bless you forever. You will make friends and enjoy experiences that you'll tresure forever. You will learn just how HUGE a sound a group can get without anyone blowing their brains out. You'll work harder than you ever have in your life, but you'll love doing it. If your MB is the type of program that focuses on quality and art and music ... well ... you'll be praising the Lord that you were inspired to play the trumpet!

    I say go for it!!! Get a good teacher if you don't already have one, and don't sweat the tough stuff. You're young! The high notes and range will come, and so will the scales, so long as you put yourself to it. Music first, though.

    Welcome to TM....
     
  3. trmpt_chica

    trmpt_chica New Friend

    49
    0
    Jun 29, 2005
    CALIFORNIA BABY!
    OH i feel soo happy u guys... :grouphug: GROUP HUG! OH u guys are soo cool to care about a loly freshy! u guys keep posting and thnx for all the posts! :D :D :D :D :D :grouphug: spread the trumpet love!
     
  4. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Chica,

    There are two keys to improving your endurance and upper register right now:

    Enjoying playing the music you like

    and

    challenging yourself by playing regularly. Everyday if you can manage it.

    Do you listen to CD's of trumpet music? Do you know who Rafael Mendez is? How about Doc Severinsen? These are great players that will help you to love playing and challenge you to learn a great many things you can't do right now. See if you can pick up a CD by Doc called Trumpet Spectacular. Also, try to pick anything with Rafael Mendez. If you ask your band or private teacher, either one will have a CD you can listen to, I guarantee, of these gentlemen.

    ML
     
  5. trmpt_chica

    trmpt_chica New Friend

    49
    0
    Jun 29, 2005
    CALIFORNIA BABY!
    well ummm another question

    okay i know i keep askin questions and well ummm since i really dont know u all and well i just wanted to know what u like do and stuff with music and trumpet
    heres an ex.

    Name: Rebecca

    how u came to luv music: I started listening to jazz and such and i just started to love it.

    what is ur involvment with music: I started playin keyboards in elemntary and then when to junior high with the trumpt and now im going to high skool

    U guys dont have to but i just want to know whose u alll are! THNX!
     
  6. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
    10
    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Rebecca,

    My name is Manny Laureano. I play first trumpet fo the Minnesota Orchestra and I have done so for 24 years although I played for 4 years in Seattle doing the same thing after I graduated Juilliard, a music school in NYC.

    I play many diferent styles of music in my job but it's mostly classical playing. I love it a lot. I am also the Co-music director of the Minnesota Youth Symphonies, another job I love very much. we have a website if you want to know what I look like. My wife of 27 years is the other co-director.

    I like just about every kind of music except rap. It's boring for me to listen to. I like music that has a lot of variety, like jazz and classical. I started out in junior high, too. I've been playing for almost 38 years and I love playing as much as I did when I was your age.

    I have two beautiful children who play trombone and violin. I'm one of a few latino trumpeters in symphony orchestras and when I saw your "Chica" handle, I thought you might be of hispanic heritage, too.

    (Still secretly wishing you'd write in regular English but, hey... I'll wait: ) )

    Sincerely,

    ML
     
  7. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

    Age:
    53
    2,259
    11
    Jan 12, 2005
    Northern New York
    Rebecca- My name is Glenn. I just now took the time to open your thread, and thought I might throw my 2 cents in. I teach band grades 5-12. I have 4 bands: 5-6, 7-8, 9-12 and jazz band. In the summer, we do a marching band, open to grades 6-12. I also judge for our state solo festivals, (we call it NYSSMA here), and play in a wind ensemble called the Northern Symphonic Winds.

    I began teaching in 1990. I started playing trumpet in 4th grade, but quit for a year because I didn't like the teacher. But I really missed it, so I came back to it. I can't imagine myself doing anything else.

    My favorite music ranges from salsa, progressive rock, classical, jazz, all over the place. I hate country and rap; I find them too predictable and for the most part insulting.

    As for learning scales, there are so many ways to do that that you really need to hook up with a good private teacher to help you find what works best for you. I will post one of my methods for teaching them in a bit, but right now I have GOT to get on the horn and practice.

    Welcome to the Trumpet Master; you will certainly learn and grow alot from the many masters here. I did.
     
  8. trmpt_chica

    trmpt_chica New Friend

    49
    0
    Jun 29, 2005
    CALIFORNIA BABY!
    Manny ur family sounds like their full of musical talent! its really cool to know that u can depend on your wife at work and at home! Wow i cannot believe you play for The Minnesota Orchestra that must be such an honor to even be able to try out for them let alone be first trumpet! I wish i had started learning music when i was your kids age, by my age they'll probably being offered musical shcolarships!! im a quarter mexican and a quarter spanish (all from my moms side) Over here in california their are alot of latino trumpeters thats an added plus on playing the trumpet (specially when the trumpets are all latino guys!):-P just kiddin! i hope i always love the trumpet like i do now! P.s. My grade in English was a B+ so im workin on it!


    Glenn over here we dont have alot of the arts, the budget cuts make it really hard to have any instruments! ( we used to have after school keyboarding but they had to get rid of it :-( ) we barley start playing instruments in junior high and i really cant get a private teacher since it takes alot of money to get ont and band cost $300 and i have to buy my own things ( valve oil, mouthpieces, mutes, etc.) maybe one of these days my marchin band can take a trip and listen to an orchestra!

    p.s. I CANNOT believe we have to march in dresses! and the guys dont!


    Thnx for tellin me about yourselfes! keep postin!
     
  9. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

    Age:
    29
    640
    3
    Jun 15, 2005
    Flagstaff, AZ
    WHAT!?!? You march in dresses! That is like so 1980's!
    But it's also cool in a way. All the marching bands in my area used to have the girls uniforms dresses and guys in pants, but that was 15 years ago. Most schools now try to get everyone looking alike, uniformity and all so that one person/section dosn't stand out.
    While we're on the subject of uniforms and stuff, this might be a good time for a quick story! A couple years ago one of our football games just happend to fall on halloween night, so instead of wearing our normal uniforms we all dressed up in costumes and matched with our section. The trumpet section all went as charictors for the Ghost Busters, I was slimer, i wore a bunch of green grabage bags and had green crap all over me, and then others wore the jump suits and dressed their trumpets up like the litle guns they use to blast the ghosts. Another notable entry to our litle costume thingie was the Mellophones and Trombones. All the mellos are female, and the trombones were all male, and there were 12 people in both sections, so they each dressed up like the other section and walked around in the clothes of the opposite sex and prettended to be each other... it was quite interesting...
    Anyways, what were we talking about and how did I get off topic? I have no idea...

    So about me...
    Well, my name is David. And I play trumpet. I also play french horn. I like long walks on the beach, and star gazeing. I recently played a concert at Carnegie Hall with my highschools music department, and while in New York I fell in love with a girl from choir on a cruise in New York Harbor. I started playing trumpet in 4th grade, but started playing music when I was three years old. I am sexy. I like sea food, but not Italian food, but I do like Italians. I also wake borad. And I enjoy talking in short, simple sentences. I don't like John Williams. I do like Igor Stravinsky and Gustav Holst. I have only kissed one girl in my whole life. and I play trumpet. Also, I play trumpet. But the most important thing about me is, I play trumpet.

    Thats about it, nothing to exciteing.
    Goodnight.

    P.S. I never did understand the point of this guy --> :troll:
     
  10. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

    Age:
    53
    2,259
    11
    Jan 12, 2005
    Northern New York
    We'll do the best we can for you, Rebecca.

    First, there are a couple books you should get: 1. Terchnical Studies for Cornet, by Herbert L. Clarke. (He was a solo cornet player a long time ago who was as famous as Wynton Marsalis is now; he was a soloists and first cornet in the Sousa Band, the top travelling band at the time). Not a very expensive book, but necessary for learning scales, building flexibility and range, endurance, and basically anything else. 2. Arban's Complete Consrvatory Method for Trumpet/Cornet. (This is a rather large book in about 15 languages; I consider it my trumpet bible. Jean Baptiste Arban was also a very famous cornetist and teacher. The book is fairly expensive, but has a wealth of information, broken into unit-like things). These two should be in every trumpeter's library, and on every trumpeter's stand. If you already own these, you are off to a great start (provided you are playing out of them the right way). Next, get some recordings of some of these people (most of which you can find on iTunes if you have it): Maurice Andre; the New York Philharmonic (Phil Smith plays first there); Ed Carroll; Wynton Marsalis; the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (Bud Herseth used to play first there until very recently; he retired); the Minnesota Symphony Orchestra (if you visit here www.monette.net and scroll down to the Prana C paragraph and click on the link in there, you'll hear and see Manny playing some excerpts). Try to note the difference between these players in terms of how they sound and how they interpret things. There are many more excellent trumpet players out there, but that should give you a good start.
    You'll hear lots of really good brass playing out of the orchestra in pieces like Symphony no. 5 by Gustav Mahler (really, ANY Mahler Symphony, but this one begins with the trumpet all by itself) Symphony no. 5 by Dimitri Shostakovitch, Pines of Rome by Ottorino Respighi, Symphony no. 1 by Leonard Bernstein, Leonore Overture (number 2 or 3) by Beethoven, Suite for Orchestra by Johann Sebastien Bach (any of the 4), Brandenburg Concerto number 2 by Johann Sebastien Bach.

    This is getting way too long, so I better let you get started. I am sure others have suggestions for you as well. This won't teach you scales, but will get you on the way to understanding musicianship and help you find "your voice".
     

Share This Page