Multiphonics

Discussion in 'Jazz / Commercial' started by butxifxnot, Jul 18, 2005.

  1. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    How in the world do you do that? I just heard James Morrison doing it...how are you supposed to do that? It sounds very cool.
     
  2. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Get out your Ernest Williams book, he explains how to do it.
    Here's an example.....play a second space A, hum a third space C and the F below will magically appear :-o
    Wilmer
     
  3. jcstites

    jcstites Mezzo Forte User

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    i find it really hard to do on trumpet. maybe because i have a semi deep voice. bass/baritone

    do you need to sing in the same register you are playing, i foudn it sounds better this way, but easier for me to do if i sing it down an octave....
     
  4. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Hmmmmm.......my voice is the same octave as the trumpet. Interesting!
    Research time.
    Wilmer
     
  5. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    The recording I heard was the man playing two tones at the same time, and then midway he split into three...??
     
  6. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

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    Pat Sheridon has amazeing multiphonic skills on the tuba.

    I can't do it on my trumpet, for me its easier on low brass, but I can do it best on french horn. I've never had that third note lock in though, is it just because of overtones and whatnot or is there something else that makes it happen?
     
  7. etownfwd

    etownfwd New Friend

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    A couple of cats who also do this VERY well are Matt Shulman and Wycliffe Gordon. Most of Mr. Shulman's recent writings have multiphonics in them, from my experience. Wycliffe uses multi's frequently (or atleast he did about a year and a half ago!) and definitely has some good licks on his album "WE" with Eric Reed. His one break section in Cherokee has about 4 bars of multiphonics. While it's not a LOT, it is a great way to hear how he can work through and around his t-bone so effortlessly. I am certain that Wilmer has more info than I about Wycliffe and some of the other cats who do this, though...
    -efwd
     
  8. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    Hum into the horn, or just in the throat? ...

    I got a sound, but, like other posters here, the 'extra' pitch is the pitch I hum, which is fairly low...humming in the trumpet register would entail humming with a falsetto, which is hard enough...anyone finding mastery of multiphonics using a falsetto?
     
  9. butxifxnot

    butxifxnot Pianissimo User

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    Alright. Next question, and this one really can't be answered by just practicing the two-note method.

    That 'magic' F: is that an overtone? Because, if it is, then is the method to playing to and then switching to three in mid-song would be to play slightly bad at first so that the overtone doesn't appear?

    So, how does the three-note multiphonic work?
     

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