Music for College Audition

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jazz9, Mar 24, 2008.

  1. jazz9

    jazz9 Piano User

    357
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    Dec 5, 2007
    Chilhowie, VA
    It's getting to be that time. I'm about to enter my senior year, and I need to start looking into what I'm going to play for my college audition. I don't want something that is so hard I can't play it under stress, but I want to play something that will get me in if I do well. Any suggestions from seasoned professionals? :dontknow:
     
  2. Mr. Stomvi

    Mr. Stomvi Pianissimo User

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    Nov 14, 2003
    Go to the websites of the colleges you are interested in attending. They should have a required audition list posted somewhere on their site. Get all your major scales and chromatic scale over the entire range of the instrument up and going pronto !
     
  3. jazz9

    jazz9 Piano User

    357
    2
    Dec 5, 2007
    Chilhowie, VA
    Oh I have the major and chromatic scales down, I've known them since freshman year at least. I'm working on minor now. I'll check out the website.
     
  4. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Jun 11, 2006
    I have advice but my experience is attending conferences and hearing what judges want. Here it is: Musical expression.
    Don't get wrapped up in technique. Allen Vizzutti beat you on technique 35 years ago. Play something romantically.
    If you can play Concert Etude at about 140 beats to the count and musically, and romantically at medium forte to pianissimo volume I would give you a place in a music school. No jack hammer playing of Concert Etude. It isn't a race. It is nearly a lullaby.
     
  5. PSH

    PSH Pianissimo User

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    1
    Feb 20, 2007
    Minneapolis MN; Denton TX
    Having just finished playing my college auditions, I can say that stchasking is absolutely right. The people that listen to your auditions will have been doing so for the past week and will probably have heard the same things a number of times. They would be much more interested in you if you played the music first and the notes second. What I mean is that if you get too wrapped up in making sure every note is right and there are no technical mistakes, you begin to lose sight of what the piece is about. I would much rather hear someone play musically with some mistakes as opposed to hearing someone play every note perfectly with no feeling. Also most colleges will ask you to play a standard solo (Haydn, Hummel, etc) and maybe some orchestra excerpts or an etude; it should all be listed on the website. Just remember that no matter what it is, it's the music that counts.

    ~PSH
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Picking a piece that fits you like a glove is tough because we do not know ANYTHING about you. If you have been playing state competitions (like NYSSMA in NY) the level 5 and 6 solos would be very suitable for auditions. The following comes immediately to mind:

    Haydn Trumpet Concerto
    Hummel Trumpet Concerto
    Arutjunian Trompet Concerto
    Goedicke Concert Etude
    Otto Ketting Intrade
    Fitzgerald Scherzo und Finale in Ab minor
    Langlais 9 Pieces

    I would avoid the conservatory showcases like the Bozza Caprice or Arban Carnival of Venice unless you can really pull them off under stress. Playing those pieces is part of what studying trumpet is about! Whatever you end up playing, research the composer, listen to other pieces by them (non trumpet) to get a feel for what they were about. Being intellectually confident in style makes your performance sound simply better informed!

    Something also important was just adressed on another thread: By the time that you have decided to go forward with trumpet, you should have the basics of breathing and the mechanics of playing together. That means a solid DAILY routine (at least one hour of playing) with long tones, slurs, repertory and chop and technique builders. You need at least the Arban and Clarke books as well as a Hymnbook to get started! Those things insure that your performances and auditions become REPEATABLE! Learn to practice hard but not beat your face up. Before an audition you need to take good care of yourself. You need to know how much you need to play to be confident and how to not keep playing if you are nervous. I have heard too many players that trash themselves by "warming up" for several hours or trying to show off before the audition. On tht day, the only notes that count are the ones played for the jury. Save the best ones for them not your competition!

    Critical is the ability to play melodies musically. If you can do that, most solos fall into place with a bit of technique touch up! This is where a Hymnbook can be VERY useful. The melodies and words are well known aiding performance and articulation.

    A clean double and triple tongue will not hurt.
    Your range/sound should be clean and full from low F# to high C above the staff. You get no bonus points for squeezing out a double C, maybe some minus points for being obnoxious........ Your rhythm MUST be perfect. There is no excuse to walk into ANY audition without great rhythm. Practice with a metronome first and check yourself out at regular intervals!

    Useful but not critical would also be the ability to transpose C trumpet parts (again, the Hymnbook is great for this!).

    No mouthpiece or trumpet switching before the audition. If you bring a clean, musical, rhythmic approach, nobody will send you home because you do not have the biggest, darkest sound on the planet.
     
  7. Jeff23

    Jeff23 Pianissimo User

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    May 22, 2004
    Brewerton, NY
    I would add the Kennan sonata to the list. I agree with everything being said so far. Make sure you know your major, minor (all 3), and chromatic scales 2 octaves so that there are no surprises -- and you'll need this eventually if not now. Note that your scales starting on F will be the weirdest/hardest to figure out if you take this approach.
     
  8. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 24, 2005
    If the school doesn't list the requirments, don't be afraid to contact the trumpet professor. Most will have an email listed on the website. If the school is nearby, it's always great if you can get a lesson with that teacher some time (as in months, if possible) before the actual audition. This will not only show your dedication to the trumpet and to doing a good job in the audition, but you give yourself a chance to come back for the audition (or another lesson) having followed the teachers advice! Note that poor practicing between that lesson and the audition would cause this to backfire...

    For most schools, recruiting is a challenge for the teacher (it's hard to find good students and it takes a lot of time), and most teachers (in my experience) like the chance to work with a future student because they get to know you a little personally and they can begin to see what they'll be getting (as a person and player) should you go to school there. Assuming you make that a positive experience for your future teacher, that can help you later if you happen to be on the bubble of either acceptence or scholarships.
     
  9. jazz9

    jazz9 Piano User

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    Dec 5, 2007
    Chilhowie, VA
    Thanks everyone for the help. Rowuk, I really appreciate the list, and I have Arban's. I hope to get the Clarke studies book soon, but I don't know of this hymnbook you are talking about. Could you fill me in on it? Thanks again for the help.
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Germany
    Any church should be able to help. I come from a Lutheran upbringing and the Hymnbook there is EXCELLENT. Chock full of great tunes with meaning behind them. In proper english too! They should be able to be purchased through any bookstore.

    A low cost alternative can be found here:

    The Cyber Hymnal ™
     

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