Music is not Work

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Patric_Bernard, Mar 29, 2008.

  1. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

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    Oct 25, 2007
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    I was just on a chat site trying to convince these people that playing music for a living is NOT a job. You get to PLAY for a a living. Its something you should only be doing because you love doing it. Therefore making practice, not practice, but a chance to better your skills. A performance, not a performance, but a chance to let loose and have a little fun. And Money, Money is just a bonus. You don't work for a living if you are doing what you love.

    Second is the money issue. Everyone needs money, I agree. But exactly how much money is needed. Well for musicians, its as much as you can get, and you work on living with that. Money is only a source of happiness, and a very small one. Of course it buys housing, and food, electricity, and all of that. But What money doesn't buy is happiness. Money doesn't buy Love, Family, Friends, Loving what you do. DO WHAT YOU REALLY LOVE IN LIFE, AND THE REST WILL FALL IN PLACE.

    My Musical Rant :D
     
  2. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    I have been a member of labor unions for more than fifty years. I am a professional musician. i make music on demand. I am a maker of music that likes to be compensated for my work. Managements would love to have the public think that we are a happy lot of people who are having a grand old time PLAYING our instruments. A tactic they use is to release wage scales to the public during contract negotiations........."THOSE GUYS MAKE THAT MUCH MONEY!"
    It is a serious business. The millions of dollars involved in the music business is not Monopoly money.
    I am serious about my art, I demand to be justly compensated for my labor.
    Wilmer
     
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  3. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    Doc Cheatham worked for many years in bands. His pension from the union was less than $100 bucks a month. This would not happen today because of union involvement in the business of music.
    Doc was a retired Postal employee. He re-entered the music profession after his retirement.
    Wilmer
     
  4. Kenzo

    Kenzo Pianissimo User

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    Nov 18, 2003
    Bristol, Connecticut
    This is one of the problems musicians battle every time discussion on fees comes up. Most people are of the opinion that musicians will play anyway. Hardly the case. I spent many years playing full time and it IS work. The years of training and practice to get to a professional level is comparable to any other profession. Also, as a professional musician the individual player is not determining what music is to be played and dealing with some Music Directors is a major job in and of itself. Playing the same show 8 times a week for 3 years IS work. It must have the same energy and fire that opening night had-even if it is your 1000th time through it. It's WORK.

    I have since become a part time player and got a "real" job. I happen to really enjoy my new career but based on your logic, since I love what I do, it is not work??

    I agree completely with Wilmer.

    Be well.
     
  5. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

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    Oct 25, 2007
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    Yes, but your doing what you love. Why is doing what you love work? And What is money anymore? I know you need it, but if you have enough to pay the bills, your good to go. You guys should feel greatful that everyday you have the ability to put the horn to tyour chops and make music, not because you have to, but because you love to. You practiced because you wanted to be better at what you do. and you got better with time. I know what we do is hard work, an exacted science, but you love it.
     
  6. jdostie

    jdostie Piano User

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    Feb 20, 2008
    How many times in school did you have to practice/play something that you didn't like? How many times did you have to practice/play when you didn't feel well, or would have rather been doing something else? Didn't it feel like work then?

    Sometimes people are blessed and get a job they love. Sometimes people learn to love whatever work they do, or find enjoyment even in seemingly detestable jobs. But as long as you are providing a product/service for someone . . .
     
  7. Patric_Bernard

    Patric_Bernard Forte User

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    Not a day in my life did I hate playing music. How can I hate playing something. Just think about it. When you play music you have the chance to play someones feelings that were written anywhere from 1 mo. to 500 years ago. You are translating what they wrote into common times. That, to me, is just an amazing thing.
     
  8. gchun

    gchun Piano User

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    Dec 10, 2003
    It depends if you are always playing the music you love. Professionals often have to play music they do not like because that's part of the job. Or having to work for or with people they do not get along wth. To loosely quote Maynard Ferguson: "You love music, but you'll hate the business."

    Garry
     
  9. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    If you are being paid for your services, it is a job. You don't have to dislike your work. I truly love music, but if I am in a recording studio making music I expect to be paid.
    I have always disliked the term "playing" when used in music.
    The musicians I have worked with are quite serious about the music they make, and about the world they make music in.
    Music is NOT my hobby.
    Wilmer
     
  10. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Mar 21, 2006
    Toronto
    I never thought of the difference between playing music and making it. I agree with you Wilmer.

    Patric, I think you might be a bit to idealistic.
     

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