Music room

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by slantws, Dec 11, 2012.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Jackson NC
    Old buildings do tend to have better acoustics than newer ones IMO, but I believe it is just a money / cosmetic thing as to what the surfaces were/are ... and possibly some competitive "keeping up with the Jones's. In all, good acoustics is just coincidental and standing on stage using amplification, I don't believe lends itself to true evaluation. Yes, I like a high vaulted ceiling as I find in many church sanctuaries, but I can discern a difference between rehearsal when the seating is empty to that when the congregation is present, and the same holds true in clubs as to the number of persons in the audience and what they are doing, down to the ware of what they are drinking or eating and the clothing they are wearing. What a hodgepodge? Add to this the enviromental temperature and barometric pressure as factors. Geez, you don't have to be an expert or analyse ... you just like it or you don't.
     
  2. fraserhutch

    fraserhutch Mezzo Piano User

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    Turtle +1 - it's easier to put a carpet on hardwood than it is to put a reflective surface of a carpet. Too much carpeting and absorbent materials and you'll end up with a dead room which may be ok (not great) for recording but lousy for practicing in.
     
  3. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

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    My music studio is in the basement, which is poured concrete. It was just too live for me and I opted to put down the carpet tiles, although they were not real plush (more like berber).
    I mention the carpet tiles for several reasons:
    - easy to put in, move, remove, etc.
    - can sometimes be found on clearance
    - using some imagination (and foam panels), they can be used to build DIY acoustic wall panels
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I still don't think such approaches anywhere near acoustic quality, but would be closer to a sound proof recording type room.

    Yes, there are some carpet tiles with special interlocking pad clips that are very easy to lay and replace a single tile if an accident should occur or remove them all.
     
  5. mgcoleman

    mgcoleman Mezzo Forte User

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    Sound proof? Not even close and, besides, I could care less about sound escaping the room. If you meant acoustically dead, that was also not the goal (I never liked playing in a dead space). The goal desired and the goal met was to slightly deaden the room by reducing some, but nowhere near all, of the excessive acoustic reflections.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I did not infer "soundproof" to the extent no sound escapes from your room or fails to move about in your room, as for recording purposes no extraneous sounds can get in. Too, I certainly don't like a "dead room" (not even a mortuary) to play and listen to music. With exception, my public school days gave me access to an auditorium with amazing acoustics. Speakers and vocalists could be heard well in the back rows of the main floor and balcony without amplification.

    In one of the colleges I attended, I noted the high ceiling of the band room held suspended cones and cylinders of various shapes and the sound seemed enveloping and enjoyable. Not near as much in the individual practice rooms.

    Now in a basement, I do expect you'd want to dampen the sound of HVAC ductwork and possibly distance yourself from motors on a furnace, sump pump, washing machines and dryers that are common to such areas.

    Alas, I now presenty don't have the "luxuries" I once knew, but I make do and enjoy and have frequent access to two church sanctuaries that are a big improvement of what I have at home.
     

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