Music Stores

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by commakozzi, Feb 9, 2008.

  1. Eeviac

    Eeviac Piano User

    There is ONE music store in town. (There are actually three, Pop's which is closed and That One On Grove which I can't find). Oxley's. Oxley's has books, trumpets, flugels, every other kind of horn in existence, and you can ask stuff. Sometimes you even get an answer! I got a good used Bach MP (can't tell it from new) for a "steal" price, etc. There's a ton of stuff in that smallish store, in the way of brass and woodwinds, PLUS he's got a fair selection of everything else from banjos to harmonicas. There's no way any place on line could duplicate that. If I want something he doesn't have, I'm sure it can be ordered. Probably cost 10-20% more than on-line, but with SO MUCH LESS hassle that it'd be a deal.

    Plus all the pawns, people at the swapmeet, Craig's List which is strictly local, etc.

    The shopping-at-a-distance thing has jumped the shark.
     
  2. misty.sj

    misty.sj Forte User

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    Jan 27, 2008
    Brisbane, Australia
    At the same time, I want a Bach 3C mouthpiece. I have been to three 'local' stores (one of them a significant drive) and they only have 7C. I've never seen a mouthpiece offered on Craigslist or Freecycle. So I'll probably order from WWBW (which actually IS pretty local to me, at only an hour away). But I'm not driving two hours round trip, because that would cost me more than shipping.

    It's all very frustrating.
     
  3. Eeviac

    Eeviac Piano User

    Well, if I wanted a Bach 3C I'd probably just ask Mr. Oxley to order it for me, if he doesn't have one there, which there's a fair chance he does. No Internet needed, much easier and simpler.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It is easy to kick a dying horse.
    Whether the problems are caused by lack of personnel or the lack of qualified salespeople by the lack of profit is a moot point. The real question is what can we reasonably expect for what we are willing to pay? Can a local music store live from what we are willing to let them earn? What possible value add can they offer?

    Instead of beating the shops up, what needs to happen to make the local store viable.
     
  5. misty.sj

    misty.sj Forte User

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    Bring the market back, of course. The high schools need to be funneling business toward the local music stores. Maybe the music stores could help by sponsoring groups, providing teaching space, etc. I think that the market will come from the junior and high schools though. Maybe the booster parents can get involved.
     
  6. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Stores can do something to grow their customer base that the Internet-based businesses can't - they can create new players.

    One way I've seen written about recently is the New Horizons program - local music groups for adults (often retired) who either have not played since high-school or never learned to play but now would like to. Some of these groups are sponsored by music stores, some by schools. Now, with the baby-boomers facing retirement and a need to fill the next 30? 40? years with activity, there's going to be a massive increase in the number of potential instrumentalists = customers.

    Unlike kids who may give up after a mere 10 years or so of lessons/instrument purchases/sheet music, valve oil, reed needs - you'll finally have a reasonably stable customer base for at least a couple of decades that has an incentive to buy from a particular local business, the one that provides instruction, a place to rehearse, maybe to perform, as well as a social meeting spot. It would seem like a winning strategy to me.

    Then, once there's a guaranteed steady source of customers, stores may be able to afford to go back to stocking a wide variety of instruments. I wonder whether the Internet-based stores will survive?
     
  7. note360

    note360 Piano User

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    I live near NYC where there are some nice music stores and that Sam Ash has a pretty good selection of sheet music (atleast compared to alot of smaller places).

    I know there are better, but Sam Ash is where i go for most stuff now adays. Its easier they are more polite and dont cater specifically to teh school base like the smaller stores. I can find most of what I need there or order it. I know I should go to the smaller one literally up the street, but it feels so weird to be in there. ITs small cramped and hard to park.
     
  8. Eeviac

    Eeviac Piano User

    Jude - I like that idea! Turn those old duffers into old puffers!
     
  9. Jude

    Jude Piano User

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    Dec 2, 2007
    Sure - and as they become more knowledgeable about music, they'll develop a greater appreciation for other people's music - street performers', for example. And with the better health they'll enjoy because of all the puffing (and sawing and banging), they'll spend less on health care and be able to tip better. Everybody wins! (No complicated rules, you'll note, when everybody wins.)
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think many of you are not aware how dramatically the market has deteriorated. Small shops that dropped the ball have almost no chance without a new start which costs money that they do not have.

    I agree, an active community can help dramatically, but MONEY is what keeps the shops afloat and banks are not as cooperative as they once were regarless of the amount of "puffers".

    This is a good start to improve customer relations! Any other low-budget suggestions?
     

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