Must-have method book(s) for self-teaching

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by The Weez, Jan 2, 2009.

  1. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 13, 2007
    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    I'm a DIY guy, and I currently use Arban's and Clarke's studies. I have yet to outperform these books. I constantly improve and can always find a harder page to turn to.

    I firmly believe that you can achieve a great deal by yourself if you have will and discipline. Of course, if you want to make a carreer out of it, it's not the best course of events. But otherwise, it's just fine.
     
  2. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Nov 5, 2008
    Michigan
    It would be interesting to see at what point the greats of the trumpet and cornet world stoped their formal training. Obviously you should be learning something all new every day in some area of your life but you know what I mean. I can not imagine Louis Armstrong,Bix Biederbeck,Maynard Furgeson,Mr. Sandaval, insert name here rtc.........Takeing formal leason's all the while they where trying to earn a liveing. That does not mean they did not keep learning from other musicians and from books ont he subject matter or from recording studio technicians etc.....

    Same thing goes for most DIY stuff. You can either sit on your hands and never try and never risk and never do anything while waiting to be able to afford to pay an "expert" to show you or you can and learn along the way the best you can. When you need the help or can afford it seek it out. I am preety sure that if I needed help I could get the local H.S. band director to help me and I do not have so much pride that I would not seek out help if I needed it. Their is also a welth of information on youtube and other internet sites. In my mind the only reason people do not try to "Do it Yourself" is because they are afraid to try. If you do not try then you can not fail now can you? In my mind I do not see it that way at all but I think that is what stops most people. I could not live my life makeing decisions baed on what could happen if I failed to do something properly that is just entirely to many what if's and maybe's for me to live that way. In fact their is nothing I can do to a trumpet useing burnish tool's,a propane torch and solder that a professional repair tech can not undo.

    So I think that "DIY" is very realistic with reguards to re-teaching oneself to play an instrument that you where once profiecnt at. It is not like someone that has never exercised a day int heir life wakeing up one morning and saying "I want to run at the Olympics and win a gold medal!" It is more like a former gold medalist takeing some time off like retirement then later saying "I think I want to try my hand at the Olympics one more time!". The latter is far more reasonable and achievable since the athlete was already at that level once before and already has all the experince and knoldge from before and knows what he had to do last time to get their. In this case the book is a guide or road map to make sure you do not forgett to include things in your come back training to make sure you are not leaveing huge gap'sin your training.
     
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  3. Brian H. Smout

    Brian H. Smout Piano User

    Hi,

    Hi,

    The Lowell Little lip studies book is a nice start. The other heavyweight books like Arban's or Clarke's need guidance and support. The Robert Getchell Book 1 studies are good and the Rubank intermediate method book would be a good jumping off point. I somewhat agree with the points made about finding a competent teacher but I live in the frozen wastes of Saskatchewan and the nearest teacher is a frigid 2 1/2 - 3 hour drive away. I content myself with the Zen proverb that "When the student is ready, the teacher will appear". I'm doing prep work again, myself. Besides, who taught the early trumpet greats? Not all were 'studied' cats but maybe had great ears and listened carefully or as Rafael Mendez is reputed to have said "there is nothing that 4 hours a day of practice can't fix".

    Good luck and prepare for your teacher to appear :-)

    Happy New Year,

    Brian
     
  4. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2008
    "It would be interesting to see at what point the greats of the trumpet and cornet world stoped their formal training. Obviously you should be learning something all new every day in some area of your life but you know what I mean. I can not imagine Louis Armstrong,Bix Biederbeck,Maynard Furgeson,Mr. Sandaval, insert name here rtc.........Takeing formal leason's all the while they where trying to earn a liveing."

    I think you would be very surprised to find out that many of them do (or did) continue to regularly meet with a teacher or mentor. Almost all of the pro players on this site refer to various teachers (or other pros) that they learn things from. Hell, even Tiger Woods regularly spends time with his coach to work on/improve his swing!

    I'm a decent amatuer player (I get pretty regular paying jobs at churches, etc.) who's been playing the trumpet since grammar school. I know a lot about the horn, and I have a lot of resources available, but for me to just pick up my Arban or Colin books and plot out a routine that will help me with my range, endurance, etc. it would be almost impossible. If I knew how to do such a thing I would have done so years ago (and I'd be playing halftime at a Bowl game instead of Arturo!).

    What I'm actively looking for now is a teacher who can help me plot a course to reach my goals. The DIY method only lets you succed to the limits of your own ineptitude. I've been fortunate that my DIY method has provided me with a fair amount of proficeincy over the last 20 years or so, but if I ever want to reach a more "professional" level (which I do), DIY will never be the answer.
     
  5. The Weez

    The Weez Piano User

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    Dec 23, 2008
    Wichita, KS
    Thanks for all the tips, guys! I'll hit the local music shop(s) this week and see what I can find. Otherwise I'll order some stuff from the board sponsors.

    I found my old Arbans last night; I forgot I had it. I downloaded some clips of the lessons being played, and today I'm going through some of them trying to play it like the clips. Not as good as having an instructor I know, but better than nothing.
     
  6. Rich Wetzel

    Rich Wetzel Pianissimo User

    131
    3
    Dec 27, 2003
    Tacoma, WA
    Charles Colin. Advanced Lip Flexibilities is a good solid thing you can work out of now and as you study with a good teacher.

    Email me when you get a chance, I can send you some other stuff too.

    In the mean time, find someone with a great reputation, someone that plays the way you want to play and that consitently turns out great students, players. Find the person that does not have just the occassional good player, but the top one in your area.

    Study with the best person you can find, it's worth the effort!
     
  7. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi Weez,
    Great to hear you're getting back in the game.
    First of all, it needs to be fun, right? I suggest getting a play along put out by Aebersold called The Magic of Miles (Vol. 51, I think). The CD accompanyment has absolutley the best musicians in the world playing the harmony. Often its Phil Wood's backup band or members from one of Miles' bands. The songs range from modal easy to pretty darned hard. You can get it cheap on ebay sometimes.
    OK now for what you need to do.
    1) warm up- play about half a song and then put the horn, go drink a cup of coffee or your prefered beverage and THEN start playing. I kid you not, the little break helps!!
    2) have an exercise program (yes exercise) that you do a little every day.
    Here's what i work on.

    Lip slurs- start on c and do lip slurs in the open position
    then C# and do lip slurs with 123 depressed
    then D with 13 depressed.
    Basically do bugel calls with all the valve combinations and be sure to PROJECT YOUR SOUND. I don't mean play louder, I mean when you play imagine you're playing to the person in the back of the room.
    Also, try to feel the sound get fat as if its expanding out. No one likes a thin sounding trumpet. Getting a good fat round sound is a good thing!! Yep, that means exercising with LONG TONES. feel the sound ring out from your body.

    a)Be sure to keep the corners of the lips firm and the aperture loose.
    b)learn how to control your air.(control of the air is what separates the big dogs from the little ones). Only use the amount of air you need to get the job done. Many trumpet players over blow and sound blatty.
    c)when you start to use pressure, check your air and notice if its an air problem or a fatigue problem.
    d)when your sound starts to suck, quit.

    A good DVD is John Thomas Secrets of Trumpet Playing
    Also, There's a compilation DVD of Rafael Mendez giving instruction thats really good too if you can find it.

    Once your confidence is up, take a couple lessons from a University trumpet professor and write down the important points. Then, take the info home and work on it like mad.
    As for fun, I'd start with the Magic of Miles.
    Good luck!!!!
     
  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

    Age:
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    May 4, 2007
    Greensboro, NC
    I couldnt find you in the members list.
     
  9. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    The Wide Brown Land
    Markie's there Bob - but you have to search - page 7 I think.
     
  10. Markie

    Markie Forte User

    2,156
    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi Weez, A book I use on my students is one that I found on ebay called The SPIT Book. SPIT stands for scale pattern inversion triad and goes through major, dominant, minor and half diminished. it is a good work out and it will get your ears to the different chord types.
     

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