Muteless in Oregon

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by turtlejimmy, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. jedwards

    jedwards New Friend

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    Jul 1, 2010
    Northern Virginia
    Hi Turtle,

    I tried Flips' Celebration horn the night I bought my Wild Thing. It's a great horn, I just fell in love with the WT so it followed me home and has been my primary Bb ever since.

    Have to agree with you about muted horn work. There are times when nothing sounds better. Just did some Miles style muted work in the studio. Nothing else would have sounded right.

    Jim
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I am not disputing "coloration" when needed, as per Miles et al. Too, I'm not attempting now to perform for others or money, I just much prefer the open sound of brass. Hey, I've got a rack of mutes, Harmon, straight, cup, and plunger in addition to my Silent Brass plus a few others and will use them when called for, but that doesn't mandate that I have to like them. Really IMO they are just novelties which doesn't deny that many like such. I've heard many using them and heard the same player without, and I'll say it once again, I prefer the open brass sound better. Next stop, a synthesizer, MOOG type, for brass! Uuck IMO!
     
  3. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Open brass is the cat's pajamas, no doubt about it. I love it too Ed.
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    As we have a cat,"Snoops", she goes in the bedroom and crawls under our bed to hide and whines when I played with Silent Brass. She also whines when I emit the Bb, not the A, from my portable Seiko metronome but doesn't go and hide. Still, will sleep through all the music I play live (without mute) or on open speaker from CD. Can't figure this cat's auditory response, not that it matters. Also, she doesn't wear pajamas, but one better not have string ties on theirs ... or else.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2010
  5. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Interesting to note ... about MUTES. If you go into Kadleck's Corner, there is a thread about mutes and in that thread is a kind of recipe for adjusting a Humes and Berg Cup Mute to make it play more in tune. For me that meant sandpapering the cork until the cup fit "just about to touch the bell, with a tiny gap." Definitely more in tune! That's a big help.

    Turtle
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I used weather stripping (not the foam type) for doors/windows to increase the thickness of the mute corks. I have a couple of horns with exactly this issue (not peashooters either). Apply a thin film of contact cement on the cork, let dry and then apply the self-adhesive weather stripping.

    Alternatively, most decent bottles of wine have corks. An exacto knife can create thicker corks from them very quickly.
     
  7. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Yet another good reason to go for the better wine!

    With cork readily available and glueing, cutting, shaping (with sandpaper or whatever) easy to do, it makes you want to experiment. I took my Jo-Ral 3 in 1 Cup Mute and sanded the cork down so that it fits with the rubber touching the trumpet bell. With no gap like this it makes a fantastic PRACTICE MUTE, very quiet and in-tune sounding, especially with the felt material ring in place. Got the thumbs up from my neighbors.

    Turtle
     

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