My Bugle

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by commakozzi, Feb 19, 2008.

  1. thefish1

    thefish1 New Friend

    19
    9
    Dec 3, 2005
    North Royalton, OH
    I marched Drum Corps from late 1972 to 1977 and then I was an Instructor for 5 years in both Jr. and Sr. Drum Corps. I even made it to the Championships with one Drum Corps. I feel that those single rotor/ single valve and then rotor and valve "Bugles" were better then most people remember. It's true that there were a lot of junk "bugles" out there back then, but still most of the "bugles" used were not that bad. and they were antiquated compaired to today's versions. But today's versions aren't even "bugles", they are "Bb trumpets".They did have some weak points to them like some notes weren't able to be played on the "bugles" so the brass instructors just had to write the music in a key so one could play the song. All the marching members back then could still produce fantastic sounds out of these "sub-par" horns. I feel that the marching members from back then could run circles around the modern day members. Just listen to Santa Clara Vanguard or Phantom Regiment. And don't forget the Blue Devils or the DeLaSelle Oaklands and a whole host of other Drum Corps from back then and thentell me that what they did wasn't incredible. They played so great with these junky "bugles". Those "bugles" were much more crisper and brilliant the "Bb trumpets" in use today. Today the trumpets all sound so flat and lifeless. No sissle. And the use of the "bugles" made the whole thing much more special. A challange to learn how to play, the whole different key thing. I played on Sapranos and Mellaphones "Bugles" That's my two cents worth!
     
  2. commakozzi

    commakozzi Pianissimo User

    218
    1
    Oct 30, 2007
    Georgia, USA
    Ditto!!!
     
  3. brad361

    brad361 Pianissimo User

    120
    38
    Feb 12, 2008
    My drum corps experience started around 1973, as an instructor, I also did some judging later on. When I started, it was 1 valve and a rotor, key of g. Next was two valves, and I got away from the activity about the time three valves were making their appearance. I was also present when judging went from the "tick" system, to all "build up", which was more subjective scoring. With every major change, some "purists" resisted. Change is inevitable, in all music, as well as most of life. Not everything new is better, but what I see DCI corps doing today is still very impressive, Bb horns or not. I remember when the kids had to MARCH everything, including tympani, and I think a lot of drum corps' metamorphosis is for the better. Just my opinion.
     
  4. David-F

    David-F Pianissimo User

    56
    1
    Feb 15, 2008
    Woodstock, GA
    I don't agree with the term sub-par horns. Take a look at the Olds line of bugles, I have two, V/R sopranos and one two piston soprano and the two piston bugle used the same streight through flow through the valves that the top line Olds trumpets used but with a biger bell, it's a great playing horn and can put out a lot of sound. I also have a 3 piston "G" soprano made by Getzen that is a ML bore .460 is well made 1st and 3rd slides and great valve action and a larger bell then most of their trumpets are made with, again a great playing horn, Kanstul also makes a 3 piston "G" soprano that's a larget bore .470 with a 5 1/8" bell I would put theise horn up against just about any good trumpet out there and they would put out a much fuller sound. Now it's true that in 1968 when Olds started to produce their bugles they were much better then the Getzen but the getzen was not bad it was a smaller bore and bell but a good quality just not as good as the Olds and you coulod tell the difference between a Getzen or Olds line the Olds just gave you a bigger sound and better sound.
     
  5. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

    Age:
    81
    1,804
    91
    Aug 28, 2005
    Grand Rapids, Mi.
    Never having played in a D&B Corps i have no persoanl experience with most soprano bugles, but, i did pick up a single valve G bugle which I use frquently for sounding Taps at military funerals and Memorial Day celebrations. The stamping on the bell logo says that it was made by George Way Drums Inc., Elkhart, Ind. I never have heard of such a maker, but, my opinion is that it was a stencil, made by Getzen, judging from the general construction and the parts used in its making. Anyone out there ever heard of such a maker?


    OLDLOU>>
     
  6. jdostie

    jdostie Piano User

    261
    1
    Feb 20, 2008
    I remember when I was in we had to march everything. I don't know, I can go both ways on this. . . I am sure there are some good changes. I LIKED my two valve soprano; heck I played it a lot more than my trumpet . . .

    I read something about the key of G having better acoustics . . . I'm not sure I understand that in terms of physics, If you transposed the music down a forth and played it on a trumpet, why would that be a different sound/different acoustics. That the "voice" of the instruments might be slightly different (ala cornet vs trumpet) that makes more sense to me, but my music theory/physics is a bit weak in this area. Also, what is the difference in bore size if any? In other words are the marching trumpets on a par with the bugles in every other aspect except key?
     
  7. commakozzi

    commakozzi Pianissimo User

    218
    1
    Oct 30, 2007
    Georgia, USA
    Someone with a better understanding of bugle construction versus trumpet construction should chime in here to correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that because the bugles are conical versus the trumpet being cylindrical makes the difference in sound that you're referring to. Here's where I may also be wrong, but I'm going to say it anyway: I think it's a good bit easier to "overblow" a trumpet than it is a bugle, and therefore much easier to play with control at higher volumes. I'm saying this based on my experience with the two horn types, but again... I have very limited understanding of the construction and it's affect on the physics of sound production, etc. It feels like the higher back pressure on the trumpet makes it harder to play as loud as you would on a bugle and maintain control. Or maybe bugles just sound good to me when you're overblowing them!!! :-p
     
  8. jdostie

    jdostie Piano User

    261
    1
    Feb 20, 2008
    Hmm: From Wikipedia - Cornet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    If that's so, I wonder why DCI didn't move to cornets etc. Why not move to a Bb instrument for ease of resale value, less need to transpose music etc. but still go for the big sound that was so loved about the drum and bugle corps.
     
  9. David-F

    David-F Pianissimo User

    56
    1
    Feb 15, 2008
    Woodstock, GA
    I'm not sure that the Drum Corps bugles were made as a true bugle or G trumpets they do seem to play more like a bugle then trumpet only contacting the makers would be able to answer that question in the past I never did get a honest answer. I thing the switch to trumpets instead of cornets has more to do with better intonation and I think the mind set of todays Drum Corps is more musical, (and less excitement) and a need for the best possible intonation which is betted abtained with trumpets.
     

Share This Page