My Edwards and a Lead Trumpet Sound

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Sep 18, 2012.

  1. Mark_Kindy

    Mark_Kindy Mezzo Forte User

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    I've been wondering some about my lead sound since I noticed that my Edwards is a little heavy, and the sound plays pretty smokey... However, I do feel that when I play that it sounds appropriate. It is truly hard to tell what sound I'm achieving from my side of the horn.

    Has anyone else had experience playing lead on an Edwards? I have a 22 bell (I believe) and a BD1 leadpipe, if that sheds any light on the situation.

    I'm also willing to post a video link to help with the judgement, though you'll have to forgive the recording quality, as it'd be on my laptop.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I don't know much about the Edwards horn but I would suggest if you feel the sound is right it probably is. You may be lightening the sound automatically when you play lead or perhaps what you feel is coming out of the bell is slightly different from what is. I played a friends own design once that felt as though nothing was coming out of the bell and the more I blew the less came out, the glass door in front of me was bending (well you know what I mean) If those you are playing with are happy and you are happy don't sweat.
     
  3. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    In theory it's really easy to choose a good lead trumpet horn. Find the one which plays the loudest, has good valves and decent intonation. The main problem is finding such a horn that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. When you do find one? Guard it like a bulldog...

    In sizing this usually though not always means something around a .463 + bore. One exception to this is the Yamaha Shew 8310-Z which although is rated at the ridiculously tight ".445" bore really behaves more like the .463. Because the tuning slide and lead pipe open up to this very same measurement. I assure you that despite the tight bore (the .445 measurement exists only within the three valves and this REALLY helps control and intonation!!!) on the Shew it is an excellent lead trumpet ax.

    I guess I didn't exactly answer your question about the Edwards horn... Perhaps the one listed with the .462 is good. From my experience anything at or below .460 just doesn't make enough noise. Again w/the exception of the Shew 8310-Z which transcends other characteristics due to it's unique engineering.

    This is my ax and I love it:

    F Besson International Trumpet in Bb by Kanstul


    The main emphasis is being able to put out the volume with ease. Maximum efficiency. To me there is a huge difference between a .459 and my .464 bore. Like night and day almost. I get just plumb tuckered out trying to get the "big sound" whilst playing lead on anything smaller than .462 or so.

    What's happening is that you want to raise the volume level your where your "wall" is. The "wall" being that place where you simply can not play any louder. I'm not talking about the area where distortion occurs but the point where it is actually physically impossible to play any louder. Distortion I believe indicates only a weak trumpet player. Not a bad horn. One who hasn't developed the big sound yet.


    It is possible to blow at the "wall" and not distort at all.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2012
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    You don't say what the director or bandmates say about your sound (whether it's "lead" or not). Not to be contentious, but the bore of a horn has nothing to do with whether one has a lead sound. There are plenty of flaming lead players right now using old Conn 38B's with a .438 bore tearing it up on a daily basis. Kevin Burns with the "Airmen of Note" comes to mind first. Heard him last April! Yeah, he's gotta lead sound. The 38B and the Kanstul clone (909?) are also very popular with Mariachi players. I would say that's a lead sound also. Lead is an attitude. Develop the attitude and the sound will be there.
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Wasn't there a screaming lead player in the 50's, early 60's that also played a 38B?? :think::think::think: What was his name? Hmm, started with an "M" I think. Mike, Mark, Mitch, Mac, no wait, MAYNARD!!! Yeah, that's it! ;-)
     
  6. rettepnoj

    rettepnoj Fortissimo User

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    Maynard who?
     
  7. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I'm thinking!! It'll come to me I'm sure! :D
     
  8. rettepnoj

    rettepnoj Fortissimo User

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    Lasse Lindgren you can find THAT horn on this site. And I have played it.....jihaaaa :-)
     
  9. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    Don't forget Brian McDonald of the Airmen of Note as well! He uses the 36B!
     
  10. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    I understand the issue, just ask your director if you cut. Honestly, I doubt actual projection is an issue for you, your sound may not cut though. You are playing on a very blending, dark set up
     

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