My embouchure problem

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by lawrebea000, Jun 30, 2014.

  1. lawrebea000

    lawrebea000 New Friend

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    I actually found, through some research, that the 5c mouthpiece I am using is not the correct mouthpiece for my lip size and type, which causes my upper lip to push itself out of the mouthpiece. I am currently trying out some new Stork brand mouthpieces to fix this.
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    You can't blame a basic 5C mouthpiece as the reason your embouchure looks the way it looks and the fact that you are using very little top lip. A 5C is a very basic, middle of the road mouthpiece - it's not going to cause that, nor is a new mouthpiece going to fix it. You can't buy your way out of what's going on with a new mouthpiece.

    A thought to consider is what's going on with your jaw, teeth and lips in relation to why you have the mouthpiece where you have it. Typically, people put the mouthpiece where it is due to comfort, and that's often directly related to a few things:

    1. How much pressure is being used
    2. how the teeth lie behind the lips
    3. how much the teeth are cutting into the lips (which is directly related to how much mouthpiece pressure is being used)

    I'm no chop doc, but that makes sense to me.

    Save your money, keep the 5C for a while, and see if you can come up with a solution that doesn't involve you switching mouthpieces. Your chops are still trying develop and if you start messing around with too many factors, that's exactly what you'll have: a mess. Work on changing mouthpiece placement first, before you look for a new mouthpiece.
     
  3. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    That is unmitigated cobblers, you place the mouthpiece not vice versa, it may be that the 5C is a bit small for you I don't know and I won't comment on it but even if you change to a Stork (Which I use because I like them) it won't change where you put you mouthpiece on your lip you have to do that WITH THE INPUT OF A GOOD TEACHER without looking for some magic bullet to fix you. The 5c is a decent middle of the road mouthpiece, a little small perhaps for some but it will not ruin your embouchure. Please take some resposibility and put it right without blaming your equipment. If your lip is being pushed out of the mouthpiece (which I doubt) then you are playing with a huge amount of pressure and won't ast long at any level.

    I am sorry if this is not what you want to hear but it is what you need to hear.
     
  4. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Lawrebea000, I'd certainly like you to cite the research or source(s) you came up with that causes you to lay aside a 5C mouthpiece.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I say forget it. This guy doesn't want help.

    The path to better is through simple, small steps. This dude wants a new mouthpiece and custom built embouchure. Let him go somewhere else where they will feed the stupidity.

    I maintain that if you don't have a foundation, nothing more advanced will help. I mentioned his missing basics. Following posts confirmed it. He doesn't want to hear it.

    I will stick by:
    breathing exercizes like yoga
    long tones
    lipslurs

    Google my "Circle of Breath" for some safe info on getting a daily routine.


    That is all that he needs for now - well I can think of a couple other things, but they are not trumpet related..

    Sommer break is a really nasty time here at TrumpetMaster!
     
  6. lawrebea000

    lawrebea000 New Friend

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    I spoke to a Phyllis at stork mouthpieces, and I am very aware that it is where I place it that affects my playing. However, if I switch to a new mouthpiece with a more appropriate size (which I need anyways; I stripped mine) I can use that when adjusting embouchure so that it makes the adjustment easier, and helps prevent it from reverting back.
    Thoughts?
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think that you are way off track. Your problem is not hardware. Changing your embouchure is not a cure for anything if the underlying habits are not broken.

    I say just buy the mouthpiece and come back in a year with the same problem. At least Stork made some money on your gullibility.


     
  8. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Much as I like Stork and their Mouthpieces I would not take mouthpiece or embouhure advice from anyone who has a business selling the things. Hoenstly I think Rowuk has it right, and believe me he will tell it like it is to anyone, even me if he thinks I need it or am being a bit shortsighted. You know you have an embouchure problem and now having been told so by people with a collective experience that totals into a couple of hundred years or even a bit more you have grasped the excuse to go on a mouthpiece safari that you don't need. Unless you deal with the fundamental issue no amount of mouthpiece changes will help you.

    This happens pretty much every year at this time on here. American young player finds they have an issue (due I believe to over stressed playing at Band Camp or Jazz Camp etc) come on here making claims that band camp a mashed in their chops and they need a new mouthpiece because, they can't play high any more, they've lost endurance, they are getting sore lips or some such problem. They are sure the problem is their equipment and no matter how much those with huge experience tell them to go to a teacher and work on breathing, long tones etc they have to find the magic bullet. It usually ends up with them being told in no uncertain terms what they need by exasperated players, wherupon they either take umbrage and we never hear from them again or they take umbrage, go their own sweet way telling us how great they are with their new expensive mouthpiece. What only happens occasionally is that in about September someone comes on and says I've got better and yep okay you guys were right I should just have done what you lot said.

    You have your choices do you want to get back in September with a sensible rebuilt embouchure or ready to try to blast away at us with your new equipment until your next breakdown
     
  9. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    What's actually happening is that your upper teeth are way in front of your lower teeth so when you apply pressure for the higher notes, your mouthpiece just slides down the slope onto your chin. I know this is the case, because I had a similar issue (though not quite so extreme).

    Solving this on your own would be extremely difficult and unlikely to meet with success. And even with an experienced tutor, it will take you a lot of serious hard work, and a big step back in playing as you relearn the basics.

    A larger mouthpiece will encourage you to play with more pressure, and will make your problems even worse. Sorry, but that's the way it is.
     
  10. lawrebea000

    lawrebea000 New Friend

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    so from all of your ideas, here is what i'm going to do:
    I am going to get a private trumpet teacher who specializes in embouchure, and have her oversee my progress. I know that hardware will definitely not make or break my performance.
    However, i am going to try some mouthpieces from stork since I need a new one anyways (like I said, the brass is exposed on mine). Also, what I mean by bigger is thinner rim.
     

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