Need help with Recording Studio

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by max3k, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. max3k

    max3k Mezzo Piano User

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    Jan 7, 2007
    I am turning a room of my home into a recording studio. What I dont know is what type of mic I should get, keyboard, software? I have Sibelius for composition. Ive tried seaching the forums, but I keep getting Olds Recording info. Thanks for any light you can shine on this subject.

    God Bless
     
  2. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Jun 11, 2006
    Go to this web page and ask Teddy Kyle questions.
    He used to post on this website as Clarence. He knew something about microphones for trumpets and brass.

    Teddy kyle's Page - TrumpetCity
     
  3. Bloomin Untidy Musician

    Bloomin Untidy Musician Piano User

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    Jan 14, 2008
    Staffordshire
    To be able to achieve a good multi-track recording using a computer in my experience requires quite a lot of money. For a start if you are planning on using a computer for multitrack recording you need to make sure that it is tailor designed for working with audio. You MUST have an excellent sound card/digital-audio interface (£1200 pounds for the studio i have). You cannot do multi-track recording on a bog standard computer. You will end up with a latency problems, computer noise added to the signal, playback issues; a whole variety of problems. I guarantee you, it will drive you up the wall! For the software Cubase SX/3, or Logic will do a good job. Unless you have lots of money, don't touch Pro-tools. It is superb, but very expensive.


    However you could achieve a relatively nice recording with a KORG workstation, two condensor mics (AKG 414) and a couple SM57(close mic) instrumental mics. I have used this type of gear for both live recording and multi-track recordings, and have achieved some nice results without the annoyance of having latency and computer noise etc. I found the AKGs lovely for doing a nice XY coincident stereo recording of a recital with D trumpet and Piano. I also found the workstation KORG interface relatively easy to use, and the sound quality, effects, and mastering function on it pretty good. The work station is also small enough that you can easily record elsewhere.

    Before you do any thing check out the "Sound on Sound" website. I am sure that there is some sterlin advice on setting up a home studio. Good luck!
     
  4. Veldkamp

    Veldkamp Piano User

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    Mar 29, 2004
    the Netherlands
    I'm recording with a MacPro, Logic Studio, a Neuman TLM-103 and Royer R-122 mic. and a Motu828. I'm not doing multitrack recording, just a lot of overdubbing.
     
  5. ertatta

    ertatta New Friend

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    Oct 19, 2004
    texas
    veldkamp took the words right out of my mouth!
    i use logic pro 8 on my macbook pro and use a mackie onyx 400F firewire interface which provides phantom power for my various condenser mics and converts the analog signal to digital. i guess if u can't afford the greatest trumpet mic of all time, the vintage tubed neumann U-67, i'd say a safe bet would be either ribbon mics from Coles or Royers. i've heard very good things about the neumann TLM-127 as well on high brass! i use sheops mini condensers along with akg minis and more often than not, a pair of 414 TLII's on my trumpet.
    obviously if u are limited by budget, consider a pair of shure SM81's as the other mics i mentioned range from $1200-$2500 a piece!
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Max3K,
    what do you want to record other than your trumpet? What type of music, instrumentation............
    You can get some decent stuff on a budget, or go over the top to make your stuff high-end.
    Like with buying trumpets, personal taste has a lot to say about what is worth it.

    For basic recording one instrument at a time, an M-Audio Fast Track Pro Mike preamp/DA/AD Converter will give you 2 high quality channels through USB to your computer - cost about $250. For a microphone, I have found that the large diaphragm (1") mikes sound best when you play up close (necessary in a living room). Cheap and decent would be an AKG C3000 for about $250.00. A good set of closed back headphones are the Beyer DT770 for about $150.00.
    If you are a student, there are good deals on Cubase which is an easy to use and very flexible recording software. You need a fast PC with a big harddrive and lots of memory too. If it will be in the same room that you are recording in, you also need to take measures to make it quiet (shock mount for the HDD, quiet fans/case).

    What keyboard depends on how serious you want to be. There are cheap generic midi keyboards at the bottom end and awesome Yamahas at the top.

    Give us some more details and we can probably home in on how to get started!
     
  7. Rezamozaffarinia

    Rezamozaffarinia New Friend

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    Jun 21, 2008
    Tehran
    IMHO, building a home studio for recording anything other than Demos of your music is a big waste of money and time,

    i have been involved in recording for years and trust me, a sound that a professional studio can give you, is IMPOSSIBLE to achieve in a home studio,

    in a real studio you have the Recording engineer, Mixing engineer and before you get the final product a Mastering engineer, these people study about 4 years to become an engineer and start working in studios, not to mention the acoustic emvironment and selection of mics, monitors etc...

    only the cost of decent acoustics for a room in your house can pay studio time, more than enough for a few albums,

    I'm not a big fan of all-digital recording but if you are still interested in building a DAW , i'd be glad to help, since this is actualy a part of our studies in the Conservatory...

    Good Luck.
     
  8. max3k

    max3k Mezzo Piano User

    590
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    Jan 7, 2007
    Im not looking to make albums. Pretty much looking to write some music for brass quintets and record them myself. I dont need anything super high end, but I have some expendable cash and would like to have something nice. the midi keyboard would be for helping with composition.
     
  9. Rezamozaffarinia

    Rezamozaffarinia New Friend

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    Jun 21, 2008
    Tehran
    OK , i got it,

    here's a very complete online source of everything you need to know. i found it a few yesrs ago and it helped me a good deal at the time...

    Tweak's Guide to the Home and Project Studio

    hope this helps
     
  10. Veldkamp

    Veldkamp Piano User

    460
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    Mar 29, 2004
    the Netherlands
    I agree with you BUT I've heard very good sounding cd's who where made in a homestudio. I've also heard bad sounding cd's made in a prof. studio made by prof. musicians and producers. Listen to the cd's of Andrea Giuffredi, he recorded them over a long period at home, untill they were perfect. It's impossible to do such a project in a studio if you're not a millionair...

    The advantage of homestudio is time. You can record and mix endlessly at home without having to spend more money on the cd. In a prof studio most people are limited in time so you have to compromise if you don't want to spend lot's of money.

    Next to that always depends on the man behind the gun, not (only) the tools he's working with.
     

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