Need help with stuck parts in my friend's trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by hanrhee, Aug 22, 2009.

  1. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    Just curious - since the only portion of the oil that has any effect is that which touches, and soaks into, the joint area, how does filling the trumpet work better than simply pouring enough in to soak the joints? It seems that when the trumpet is filled, 99.99% of the oil is not touching any of the joints.
     
  2. Trumpetman67

    Trumpetman67 Piano User

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    Well, my trumpet had ALL slides shut, therefore having to fill up the trumpet so it reaches.
     
  3. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Considering that a trumpet has slides running in three differing directions, the only way to get a constant supply of oil to the inside of all the slides would be to immerse the instrument in oil. At old 'Bill' Johnsons shop we used a tank of kerosene for this, before the advent of ultrasonic vibratory cleaners, which are safer,cleaner, faster, and leave no noxious smelling kerosene residue that has to be flushed out with a solvent or detergent.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  4. Trumpetman67

    Trumpetman67 Piano User

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    Or just fill it to the rim ;-)
     
  5. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    There is a product called Liquid Wrench. Been around for decades and it's made to loosen stuck/rusted metal parts. But any good repair shop can do this quickly and cheaply.
     
  6. Trumpetman67

    Trumpetman67 Piano User

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    Hey, what ever works. For me... Simple
     
  7. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Liquid wrench is designed to work on iron-based (i.e. rusted) things -- it doesn't work so well on brass or nickel -- brass and nickel don't rust, they oxidize, which is kind of the same but the chemical makeup is quite different from iron oxide so that chemicals built to deal with iron oxide don't do much for brass or nickel which is oxidized.
     
  8. NickD

    NickD Forte User

    This one has been described already, I think, but allow me my 2 cents worth.

    A buddy of mine, a repairman, showed me this. He would take a piece of lamp cord or speaker wire, about three feet, and stick it through the stuck slide. Then he would repeatedly and firmly pop the cord snap it back and forth, to remove the slide. He would do this over a towel or pillow as the slide will come out suddenly. This has worked well for me on some pretty seriously stuck slides.

    Now, if the slide is bent or the tubing bent it had been forced together by a kid, you might have a bigger repair problem. In that case, I'd take it to a tech.

    Nick
     
  9. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    One caution with the method NickD describes -- if one side of the slide is free already and only one side is stuck (as often happens) the free side will pull right out and deform the tuning slide beyond repair, so use this technique very cautiously. Try to determine if both sides are stuck equally (or nearly so) or whether one side is still very free before using it. This is a technique commonly used by repair technicians and it works very well on 1st, 2nd, 3rd slides (even if one side is already free) because the bend in the crook is so tight that it won't get deformed. But with the much larger, gentler curve of the tuning slide, use extreme caution. And always combine this technique with the use of some sort of oil -- penetrating oil or even valve oil if you have nothing else -- before attempting to use this technique.
     
  10. hanrhee

    hanrhee New Friend

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    Aug 14, 2008
    Thanks for all of your answers guys.
    I eventually took it to a music store where the kid and her dad bought the horn.
    Luckily, they didn't charge anything.
    Cool.
     

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