Need Range Help!!!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by DeerSlayer555, Jun 17, 2008.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

    7,801
    2,360
    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Yes, the invisible "S" is silent.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,964
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    My horns have no possibility to attach the mouthpiece in the smack middle.

    I do NOT recommend TRYING to "center" the note. The note rides on the air and if the horn/mouthpiece is in tune and your breath support and chops are together, the rest just works. Getting the breath support and chops together happens 2 octaves lower not above high C.
    Pencil trick, circle of breath all provide the FOUNDATION upon which the house can stand. Technical tricks on the roof will not make a bad foundation stronger.

    That being said, the thread owner claims to have a solid high F. Backing off on force and focusing on building a more controlled aperature could provide quick benefits. When your range just "stops" and suddenly gets thin, you have run out of something. Usually that means you have run out of chop control and use force to compensate until you squeeze EVERYTHING off.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2008
  3. claminator

    claminator New Friend

    15
    3
    Jun 18, 2008
    Rowuk,

    You miss understand when I say center the sound.
    I'm talking about listening to the sound and a little help from a tuner
    when playing in the extreme upper register.
    I don't know about anyone else but my horn and mouthpiece are never "in tune". Its through good practice that I play in tune.
    We also know that there will never exist a trumpet that plays perfectly in tune. When I say smack middle I mean the most responsive and beautiful vibration you can get, (not a forced sound) only an extension of good tech. in the lower\middle register. Obviously having the best sound and playing perfectly in tune are not always the same. (when talking only about the fundemental series of vibration) However, in this imperfect world, this is a good start. goodluck!

    Clammy
     
  4. DeerSlayer555

    DeerSlayer555 New Friend

    30
    0
    May 25, 2008
    St.Louis
    Thanks for all of the tips!
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,964
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Clammy,
    we may be even saying the almost same thing. Playing on the resonant center of each pitch is the highest efficiency - AND if the equipment is decent and the body use ok, it is a good start for in-tune playing.

    I just do not have my students trying to "visualize" individual notes in the upper register. I try and get their breathing and chops strong and the intonation seems to just fall into place. I only use a tuner to get one note. I consider its use for scales to be counterproductive because it models the well tempered scale that does not sound "in tune" when playing wind instruments. Drones work MUCH better and faster. Chris Leuba (ex horn from the Chicago Symphony) did an incredible book on intonation. I got my copy through Monette. I can strongly recommend it before tackling any type of intonation exercize in any octave! Maybe somebody here has another source?
     
  6. claminator

    claminator New Friend

    15
    3
    Jun 18, 2008
    Rowuk,

    I agree! I've used drone work for years. Great stuff.

    Clammster
     
  7. Euphoniumlord

    Euphoniumlord New Friend

    12
    0
    May 27, 2008
    Kurt Thomson has a lip workout idea on youtube. His username is yourbrassinstructor
     

Share This Page