Need to clean horn

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RX-2Fan, Oct 23, 2008.

  1. RX-2Fan

    RX-2Fan Pianissimo User

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    Oct 19, 2008
    Tampa FL
    Hey i just bought a Cavalier Trumpet that is beleived to be from the mid 1930s, I am planning on using it, but i need to clean it out and polish it. I still havent recieved the horn so i cant be too exact on detail yet but what is a good cleaner that i can use to kill bacteria and other stuff that is probably in there. what would be a good polish and if any of the slides are stuck, how can i get them out without involving a shop.

    here is a pic of the horn. got it on ebay, hoping to get a good amount of use out of this. so any info you have to help will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
     

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  2. MFfan

    MFfan Fortissimo User

    3,247
    91
    Sep 13, 2006
    Kalamazoo, Michigan
    Welcome to the forum. You are about to join the "peashooter" small bore trumpet forum. It is definitely from the 30's. Should be fun to clean up and play. As for polishing the silver plate, many of us would recommend MAAS metal polish obtainable from Wal-Mart, Walgreens, etc. 4oz tube is $6 at Walgreens and less at WM. Very long lasting shine an great cleaning ability.
    If you have any stuck slides, soak the joints with WD 40 or PB Blaster several times and let it soak in. Carefull pulling or tapping, using a hard flat stick and rubber hammer works often. With my old American Standard, 33 vintage, I froze it over night, than ran boiling water over the joints and tuning slide and than used a careful, fairly vigorous tapping method described above. After a couple of minutes, it started to move, then came all way out with no damage.
    The simplest way to clean it is to disassmble the parts, run warm water in the tub or container, put dish soap in, and let it soak for a couple of hours. Put the pistons in a drinking glass and soap and water only up to the top of the piston, not getting the felts or corks wet.
    Run a snake thru all the slides and horn body, rinse well all parts and set aside to completely dry. Then reassemble, puting grease (recommend Bag Balm ) on the slides and your favorite valve oil and you should be in good shape. Let us know how it turns out or any problems:lol: I'm sure other will chime in with variations.
     
  3. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

    Age:
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    May 4, 2007
    Greensboro, NC
    Agood mild polish such as silversmiths is excellent. as for the slides, I would let a repair shop pull them, if you do it yourself you could dent the inside of the slide bow. for cleaning find a repairshop that offers an acid bath cleaning. After that just a regular bath with soap and water works fine. If you like I can send you my paper on trumpet care and maintainance.

    Bob Grier
    [email protected]
     
  4. Mason

    Mason Pianissimo User

    157
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    Oct 7, 2008
    Australia
    can i ask, why did you get a old horn? Arnt the newer ones better or something. And New ones are clean etc
     
  5. Alan Dismukes

    Alan Dismukes Piano User

    274
    3
    Oct 16, 2007
    Alabama
    1) "new" does not equal "better"

    2) "new" usually costs more; a good vintage horn is a lot of value for a lot less money.

    3) "new" doesn't stay new for long
     
  6. edcon1981

    edcon1981 Mezzo Forte User

    857
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    Jun 25, 2008
    Central Jersey
    just ignore mason, he does this from time to time

     
  7. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

    Age:
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    Aug 28, 2005
    Grand Rapids, Mi.

    I just had a local music shop,( R.I.T. Music in Grand Raoids, Mi. ) ultrasonic clean one of my horns on a trial basis. It is PHENOMINAL!!!!!!!!!! The cost was only $40.00. The horn looks like brand new. The slides are slick beyond my wildest dreams, and the valves are ultra fast and smooth. I intend to take more of my horns to them for their 'magic cleaning'.


    OLDLOU>>
     
  8. RX-2Fan

    RX-2Fan Pianissimo User

    61
    0
    Oct 19, 2008
    Tampa FL
    Thanks for the welcoming. Thanks for the directions on what to do. MFfan, is dish soap the strongest thing i can use? i would take it to a shop but i dont want to get it back dented up, shops near my house have bad rep. I bought this horn because ive heard good things about them and because of the price they sell for. also i cant use my old horn for everything. Should i use the mouthpiece that its coming with(looks like original, at least from the era) or should i use my bach 3c?
     
  9. MFfan

    MFfan Fortissimo User

    3,247
    91
    Sep 13, 2006
    Kalamazoo, Michigan
    Well, you can use CLR or "The Works" lime remover. Do the same thing with the horn, but put in the recommended amount of the product for the amount of water you have in the horn's tub. Let it work for 15 min. You will see chemical action taking place. The same for the pistons in a glass, filled up only to the top of the piston, nothing on the felts, etc. I don't know if this model has bottom springs or not. After that period of time , rinse thoroughly several times an allow drying, etc. I have used that on several old horns and the muck really comes out. Use a snake brush also.

    You can use any mouth piece you want to, I believe. I use modern ones on my old horns and some OE's also. The one that comes with it would be good to compare to the 3c. Any mp would give a somewhat different response. I like open players, like my vintage OLds 7c and 3, plus a jet tone Merien C.
     
  10. RX-2Fan

    RX-2Fan Pianissimo User

    61
    0
    Oct 19, 2008
    Tampa FL
    Thanks for the CLR tip. So i was looking at the picture and i noticed the first valve is higher than the others. You this is a spring issue, valve cap not screwed all the way, and are these horns prone to rust? If so were?

    Thanks
     

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