Need to clean horn

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RX-2Fan, Oct 23, 2008.

  1. borge705

    borge705 Pianissimo User

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    deleted
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2012
  2. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    How about a suggestion of a couple of commercial products I've found to work well? Dr. Dan's Horn Soap is good stuff (substitutes: Yamaha Horn Soap, Lemon Joy, dilute Simple Green) for the bath. The HW Brass-Saver snake/swab set is a big improvement over the old wire swabs, plus the snake is metal-free and flexible enough to go completely through any slide. OK, a third: except for the 1st/3rd slides on horns with rings or triggers where the slide needs to move with very little force, I don't think you can beat Schilke's slide grease. Enjoy the horn. I've been working on an old peashooter myself, trying to find the best mouthpiece for such a small-bore horn (leader so far: Stork LTV10, but I'm still working my way through the collection).
     
  3. RX-2Fan

    RX-2Fan Pianissimo User

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    MAAS metal polish worked great. borge705 what do you meen by sodium carbonate & aluminium foil method? is that a cleaning method? please explain. as for mouthpiece, i think 7C and smaller because it could play flat even with such a small mouthpiece.
     
  4. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    A lot of people use Simply Green and it can be used full strength on silver and lacquer that is in good shape. It is rather mild I use a product that has the same ingredient as Simply Green but is about 1000 times more concentrated and so far it has not hurt any trumpet I have from Lacquer to Silver to raw brass. For the valve area's spray it full strength in the bores and onthe valves them self. I have used this active ingredient on Nickle Silver valves and Monel and have no reaction at all. For the rest of the horn the General rule of thumb is 7 to 1 which is so darn mild you could wash init and not have an issue bareing allergy to the ingredient. For the leadpipe and main slide I will normal dip my snake into the stuff 100% and pull through them but seldom does the rest of the horn need that level of cleaning it is just the valves, leadpipe and main tuneing slide hence the 7 part's water to 1 part simple green int he tub.

    Anyting in the valves engine that this stuff will not remove can normaly be removed with either rubing alchol or lighter fluid. Lighter fluid is stronger so I try rubbing alchol first. I like to use the least harsh chemical I can that will do the job.

    After you get it clean mild dish saop like Dove will do just fine for general cleaning. As to bacteria all soaps and detergents have anti-bacterial properties plush the mechanical action will ripa nd tear the cell walls of many bacteria and virus's. I mean dish soup will kill aids in a test tube so theiryou go. I doubt you are going to run into too much inthe trumpet especialy if it is silver as silver is anti bacterial all by itself. If you are a real super germ freak boil your moth piece in water after you scrub it out with anti-bacterial hand soap.

    DO make sure youput a towl inthe bottom of what ever you put the trumpet in tub, sink, plastic bucket as it will cut down on scratching and it will keep parts from moveing around. Valve cap's are usualy the hardest area for me to get clean because of the nooks and tight spaces. An old tooth brush works great for them much better thenthe brush's in the cleaning kit for trumpet's!
     
  5. borge705

    borge705 Pianissimo User

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    Hi RX

    Have a look at this thread...

    http://www.trumpetmaster.com/vb/f131/polishing-40998.html

    Basically, you dissolve approx 1 cup of sodium carbonate into around 20 litres (5 gallons) of hot water. About as hot as you can touch. Disassemble the horn and loosely wrap the parts in aluminum foil. DO NOT DO THE VALVES. Place the foil wrapped parts into the solution and leave until the water is cool. The water will bubble and look a bit scary. I'm not a chemist, but I understand that the sulphur, which causes tarnish, bonds to the aluminium foil instead of the silver. Your horn comes out clean without removing any silver, as polishing does.

    One tip. make sure you rinse the horn really well afterwards. The foil breaks down in the process and little pieces may drift into the slides.

    I bought a 1kg bag of sodium carbonate from the pool section of my local supermarket for just a few dollars; a product called "PH up".

    If you read the thread above it will give you more info. It's a safe method and I was amazed how well it worked.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2009
  6. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Yes i do but it should be sodium bicarbonate! I might not spell worth a darn but I rember chemistry well. I just stoped and figured it out counting H.S. and college I have had 5 chemistry class's that is insane for non-chemistery major!!! Probably explains though why I make some of my own chemicals and such from scratch!!! That I can be cheap at times!!!LOL
     
  7. borge705

    borge705 Pianissimo User

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    Sodium carbonate (soda ash) and sodium bicarbonate probably both work. I used sodium carbonate.
     
  8. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    Sodium carbonate is readily available in the form of washing soda, and is pretty much the standard for use in electrolytic cleaning of ferrous metal parts. For the method discussed here, it probably doesn't make much difference whether you use washing soda or baking soda - but washing soda is probably going to be cheaper in the quantities you need. Personally, I don't use that method.
     
  9. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Are you in the UK by chance? I ask because I have never heard of washing soda before here in America and it is a bit of novelty to me? So do elaberate for us yank;s that have no clue? I take you by the conversationt hat you have some product that is for washing but how do you use it? Do you toss it in the washing machine with the clothe's or what? Thanks!!-John
     
  10. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    Well, here in California, we just look at the top shelf in the detergents section for a large yellow* box. Not all stores carry it; it's not that widely used any more. But it's not all that exotic, either: Arm & Hammer makes it, just as they do the baking soda.

    *Corrected posting. After looking in the garage, I realized the box is yellow, with large splashes of blue hype here and there.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2009

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