Need to play less pecky

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by cobragamer, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. cobragamer

    cobragamer Pianissimo User

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    I have been working on the third movement of the hummel and my teacher said my double tounging is very pecky. I am not sure how to think or practice as I am also not sure completely wahay to listen for while playing.
     
  2. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    My interpretation of 'pecky' would be that there is too much space between the notes that you double tongue. My suggestion for that is to keep the air flowing through the double tongued parts. Instead of tu ku tu ku aim for tookootookoo. The air always has to move forwards.
     
  3. HSOtrumpet1

    HSOtrumpet1 Pianissimo User

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    I say the same as the person above. Make sure your horn is up and not pointing to the floor, and that you are breathing deeply and releasing evenly to get a good air flow. Make sure to keep the air going throughout the phrase.

    .
     
  4. guitarsrmine

    guitarsrmine Piano User

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    Maybe you should sound more Alperty, since playing like Gregory Peck isnt cutting it(get it-pecky,Alperty?) HA
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I read the problem a bit differently. It is possible to play short notes without it sounding chopped up. That is a symptom for your breath support not being adequate.

    In that case, the tongue "attack" actually supports the sound and the sound "dies" quickly after the initial shot of air. If our breathing is working correctly, the tongue merely interrupts the airflow and can control the length of the note. The support is not "subsidized" by articulation, rather carries itself, reducing the effort and increasing the "thickness" and "quality" of each note.

    Slow the passage down to half speed and listen, how much effect does your attack have on the shape of the sound?
     
  6. RHSbigbluemarchingband

    RHSbigbluemarchingband Mezzo Piano User

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    bad info, nevermind lol
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2009
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    NO, NO, NO!!!!!!!!!

    DO NOT TRY THE SYLLABLES WITH D AND G FOR THE HUMMEL (Haydn or Baroque music in general..........)!!!!! This music calls for very clean and quick articulation. If there is a problem SOLVE IT!!!! Don't put a sloppy bandaid on it.

    There are places where D and G can be of use, if your breathing is together, not very often in classical music however.

    D and G are not fixes for anything, they are just an extension of our possibilities.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2009
  8. kcmt01

    kcmt01 Mezzo Forte User

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    First of all, I don't really know what "pecky" is. The nearest I can come up with is the "peckhorn", which was an alto horn usually used to play on the off beat, as sort of an accent, in marching bands. So maybe your teacher means you're not accurate enough. On the other hand, I can tell you what my worst vice is in playing double or triple tongue: I tend to close too harshly, so there is a gap in the airflow. Sort of; t'oo k'oo with a little snot leaking out of my nostrils. The only cure is to practice your technique. And remember your Kleenex.
     
  9. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    This is what I was trying to get at.
     
  10. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    I'm guessing that "Pecky" is where you are not keeping the air flowing and chopping off the notes to sharply.
    Basically, the tongue interupts the air flow. Keep the air moving and your tongue moving LIGHTLY AND PRECISELY like a rapier. If possible, record yourself so you can hear what your teacher is talking about. This of course is dependent on you using your air properly to begin with. With that said, you may want to take a second look at Rowuk's entry. He brings up a very good point about air control that's worth seriously looking at.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2009

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