Nerves, adrenalin etc that may affect your performance

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpetnick, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Weez, this is me exactly. I can stand in front of a room full of technical specialists and speak intelligently on the complexities of large Gas Turbine Engines or aircraft systems - but give me a trumpet solo and I'm jelly (Jello).

    What is the reason - nerves caused by lack of preparation. As an educator of some years experience I see proper preparation as the only given in performance - and I fail to prepare trumpet well enough.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    DHEA? I think you are missing a couple of letters.................
     
  4. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    I've been playing for over twenty five years, and I have just recently realized that my performance has nothing to do with the nerves. My pastor called me up a few years ago to say a few words about my being overseas (Iraqi Freedom), and the exact same symptoms hit me......dry mouth, unable to catch my breath, and a serious case of the shakes. Just last Sunday, I played "Great is Thy Faithfulness" in concert C. I never had to play above D on the staff...so easy I could play it in my sleep, but about 5 min before the solo, the nerves kicked in and my playing suffered horribly. I could'nt buy air to blow. I don't think I'll ever be comfortable in front of a crowd.
     
  5. anschoo

    anschoo New Friend

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    Yes it is bad
     
  6. jason_boddie

    jason_boddie Piano User

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    Ok, finally a subject that I can speak with some authority (for lack of a better word).

    First, I want to point out that FEAR (False Events Appearing Real) can be overcome with preperation in most cases. If you know your pieces like the back of your hand, you will be cool as the other side of the pillow. That would probably solve 80% of all stage fright.

    Next, for those that it does not. Stage Fright (fear) manifest itself in a variety of differne t ways. For me, it always increased my heart rate, which made breathing properly impposible. So, I would break the curtians and couldn't support my sound because I couldn't get my heart low enough to take deep supported breathes. As a singer that is a death sentence.

    Someone suggested the following to me. BTW, I am not saying that medication is the only way just one that worked for me.

    I consulted with a Dr that treated this in many musicians. The heart rate increase comes from your body producing and releasing into your blood stream a massive dose of adreniline. That is the hormone that we hear of in the "fight or flight" syndrome. It makes your heart rate increase to speed up the delivery of oxygen through put the body, allowing you to "Fight or Flight: with more speed and effeciency. That is the exact oppostiie of what needs to happen when you are trying to remain calm, so as to deliver a positive and prepared performance.

    Now, that is the why; what is the solution? There is a class of drugs out there called Beta-Blockers. They actually give it to heart patients to prevent rapid heart rates. It works by "blocking" your bodies production of adreniline. You take it about 20-30 mintuess before you break the curtains and you are good for a few hours.

    You are mellow, and calm. The only draw back for a Trumpet player is it does give you cotton mouth, so you have to drink alot of water.

    Now I don't think this method is for every performance or performer. Small shows 100 or less I didn't worry about it. But, most of our shows had several thousand people and that would make most people nervous wrecks.

    Once, I started doing this ot was fun again. I could actually concentrate on performing as a whole, instead of watching the music fly by in my head.
     
  7. entrancing1

    entrancing1 Mezzo Piano User

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    I suffered with performance nerves for 38 years. I would play solos perfectly in rehearsal and then botch them royally in performance. I was participating in a workshop in clinical hypnosis and volunteered for a demonstration. The trainier quickly identified my problem to a belief i developed as a result of a brief interaction with my mother as a child. Anyway... in 15 minutes he helped me to change this belief at an unconsious level. I no longer have the problem and now tend to play solos in performance, better than in rehearsal. :-)

    A trip to a clinical hypnotist/performance coach may be helpful.
     
  8. entrancing1

    entrancing1 Mezzo Piano User

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    And no, I didn't cluck like a chicken or bark like a dog. Woof?
     
  9. connmaster

    connmaster New Friend

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    roflroflrofl
     
  10. a marching trumpet

    a marching trumpet Mezzo Piano User

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    I'm a junior and what we do is my friends and I will do a fist pound and say "balls to the wall" to each other, helps alot cause it's like a verbal commitment, down south that's a big thing. Also, once you realize im stuck out here might as well do it big. If your gonna mess up or make a mistake don't be the little black bear in the forest, if your gonna be a bear BEA GRIZZLY, that's what I was always taught.If your gonna mess up atleast be half decent and mess up, don't mess up by being scared. Mess up bein a man
     

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