Never buy a horn from a company without a decent return policy

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by gerardo1000, Jul 4, 2009.

  1. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Gerardo,

    Thanks for doing the right thing and giving us a heads-up. While you can see that many of us have already worked this out, and exhaustively research prior to purchase, your post serves as a timely reminder to those who aren't so particular.

    There are options for you under common law, and many of these have been addressed in this thread - so over to you - if you choose to do nothing, then that is your call, but me, well I would 'climb into 'em'.

    Bottom line - thanks for exposing your "stupidity" in a public forum - that is always hard to do, and thanks for reminding us that the buyer should beware. If you have an instrument in your hands prior to purchase then you avoid all this drama - try before you buy - or be prepared to lose the money. That being said - Well done, I hope you have a positive outcome.
     
  2. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    Mar 6, 2007
    Ithaca NY
    Gerardo,

    I hope you are able to follow some of the advice given here concerning recovering the money you spent on junk. I believe that if you are tenacious enough you will do so. Please let us know how you make out.

    Mimic is right, though, you have to start somewhere and if you are a non-musical and fairly clueless parent who still has the admirable goal of exposing their child to learning to play an instrument, it is reasonable that you would make a similar honest mistake and end up with junk. The POS makers readily take advantage of this market and it is a shame. I imagine many parents never realize the error and figure their kid is just musically challenged, and neither the parent nor the child ever find out that a poor implement was the culprit. The result is the proliferation of less musically aware/educated folks who grow up and are even less likely to embrace the worthy goal of musically educating their children than were their parents. It seems to me that this would eventually destroy the market and result in business failure for the junk makers. It is said that a parasite never kills its host - for that brings about the demise of the parasite. The laws of nature may be broken by mankind, until he suffers the same fate.

    veery
     
  3. mimic

    mimic Pianissimo User

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    May 3, 2009
    Pennsylvania
    Amen Veery715. This is a real fear I have concerning the instrument market today. Those of us on these forums would be considered genius level because of our pursuit of horn info. The vast majority of people don't have a skill set or interest in or the time to research a purchase. Is it realistic to expect anyone to search internet forums for days or weeks when contemplating a couple hundred dollar purchase for their child. I've spent more taking my family out to eat in a fine restaurant for heaven's sake! That is one reason I wish the long established brass co's. would get into the intro market. I watch my 12 year old son beat the crap out of his Bach, that would take 1000 dollars to replace, and can see the economics of buying that 125 dollar horn from WalMart. Problem is I want him to excel and its difficult to do that on really bad horns. This is the every day choice many parents face, and alot of those parents had little or no musical training so think it's maybe a silly pusuit underneath it all.
     
  4. Blind Bruce

    Blind Bruce Pianissimo User

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    Winnipeg Canada
    Get your child a cheap horn. IF he/she really considers the instrument a good venue and respects the horn, THEN get a good student level horn. THEN, when established as a good student, go to the intermediates. If the child tears up a chineese unit, it wasn't meant to be. Just my $.02
     
  5. mimic

    mimic Pianissimo User

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    May 3, 2009
    Pennsylvania
    That would seem to be a logical progression. The problem I have following that is that some young kids think, and for good reason, they sound so bad on their horn they give it up or the parent hears them play for a couple years and assumes their kid just isn't fit for band. You also would get into alot of cost now. Thank god my son chose trumpet, they are cheap compared to all other band instruments. With student horns costing close to a 1000 dollars and intermediates close to 2000 that is a stretch for many parents. Their default option is the POS ones for 100 or little more.
    This is something I always chew on......I started playing coronet in 4th grade. My parents bought a Silvertone from Sears for 99 dollars. It played well for the first few years but I grew out of it and there just wasn't any money to purchase another. My cousin started at the same time on coronet and his parents bought him a new Olds Ambassador for 150 dollars, if memory serves me well. He had his horn all the way through school and I played it every chance I got. It was a great player. That is why I wish the really good mfgs. would make entry level horns. My uncle made a 150 dollar investment that took my cousin to and into the college level. That coronet is still played today by his kids.
     
  6. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    Jan 25, 2007
    Canada
    Gerardo 1000. Perhaps it's none of our business, but in the interests of the Trumpetmaster memebers, how much did you get stiffed for?
     
  7. gerardo1000

    gerardo1000 Pianissimo User

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    Jun 3, 2009
    The cornet was the Schiller "Pro Rose Bell" model (...) and it was sold at the best price of $ 389.00 (according to the store, the "official" retail price is over 1,200.00...)
    I was offered a floor model, in like new condition, for $ 271.00.
    This is what I bought.
    You know, If I had spent $ 99.00 like you can spend today on E Bay for a
    "Weimar", or "Tristar" trumpet (all made in China or India) I would complain much less. Yes, the instrument would still be a piece of junk, but you cannot pretend too much for $ 99.00.
    300 dollars, instead, are not such a small amount of money. Bach, Jupiter, sell
    brand new student trumpets for this price ( as I, too late, learned).
     
  8. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    If you give us the name of the store we can call and harass them. Pretend we want to buy and bug them until they don't want to answer the phone.
     
  9. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Oct 18, 2007
    The Wide Brown Land
    Bruce, it may be a truism, but you get what you pay for.

    Buy your child as good an instrument as you can afford and you will be either rewarded with music or (at the very least) a perpetual asset.

    If you think $1,000 is expensive for an instrument, then hope that your child doesn't take up the tuba (our King is appraised and insured for $10,500) or even a trombone our King 1201 LT (insured for $5,800). Be thankful you're buying in the states - a Gertzen 700SP Intermediate horn was offered to me new in Australia for AUD$1,875 in one of the larger muscic stores. I landed one incl freight, duty, GST and purchased from the US for AUD$1,125. We have a house full of music (and pretty redheads). :D

    There is always someone worse off whose circumstances and experiences are different - we need to help them if we can - Bruce, I'm NOT having a shot at you.
     
  10. gerardo1000

    gerardo1000 Pianissimo User

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    Jun 3, 2009
    Update: The retailer finally contacted me and offered a refund if I accepted to pay for their shipping expenses (fair enough) and for a re-stocking fee of $ 50.00.
    I accepted. Better to lose $ 70.00 than $ 300.00.
    Thanks everybody for the tips, the opinions, and the support !
     

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