New Boy - Progress Report

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Old Bugle Boy, Feb 2, 2015.

  1. Old Bugle Boy

    Old Bugle Boy Pianissimo User

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    Jan 8, 2015
    North Yorkshire
    Greetings from North Yorkshire,


    Thanks to all those who replied to my introduction over in The Green Room some three weeks or so ago (3 weeks playing trumpet already! I should be really good by now - ha - yeah right.) In amongst all the witty banter and general abuse about being from Yorkshire (!) one or two members said to keep you informed about how I'm getting on.

    So far I've been practising about an hour each day most days. After some 50 years or so since playing the bugle as a lad in the Army Cadets I've focussed a lot on 'getting my lips back in' or I guess I should say 'developing my embouchure'. So far so good but in a moment of enlightenment I realised I've voluntarily thrust myself into this strange new world of something they call 'music'. (When I were a lad, 'music' was something the posh kids with rich parents went off to learn after school with private tutors.) So onto scales, clefs, slurs and all manner of new things, into deep unknown territory.

    Progress so far then, I've read scores of internet sites about music (see what I did there?) including an entire online book on music theory, put in a fair bit of practice learning the Major C scale, up and down - I hope that's the right way to say it. So far I can play (play:- a loose term that describes my blurting sounds) from about G below the staff to around A above the staff, and sometimes bumble out somewhere deep below the lower G (not a pleasant sound) and with effort sometimes squeak out to a high C (also not a pretty sound.) So, embouchure-wise, I think not too shabby so far. Following some advice that I read somewhere I'm also practising playing soft with light pressure and getting out of some old habits formed in early bugle playing days when everything was played at max decibels - a deliberate tactic designed to wake up the whole town on Sunday morning band practice days - they used to love us!)

    I'm mixing my basic practice sessions with learning a few simple tunes (got to be some fun in there right?) I've found Christmas carols lend themselves to fairly easy learning and have Silent Night, Ding Dong Merrily on High plus a couple of others including Abide With Me, Three Blind Mice and my all time favourite, Il Silenzio, which I can now play almost all the way through without looking at the sheet.

    Being a bit keen on technology, I've found a useful App for my iPad called 'Tunable'. This contains several learning features including a metronome, a tuner so I can get an idea if my notes are accurate (allows setting to B flat) and a very handy recorder so I can hear how bad I sound.

    Finally, equipment. I have a second hand Yamaha T100S student level trumpet that came with an Arnold Clark 5C mouthpiece. I've also bought a couple of other mouthpieces to try out, a Yamaha 14A4a and a 3C - thought it would be useful to see the differences. I've just bought a second hand John Packer SW251 that comes on good recommendation and which I'm hoping will provide a more 'intermediate' experience. I'm already feeling like I'm 'outplaying' the T100S (not sure if that's a meaningful term) but I feel the need to move up.

    You might gather I'm doing this just for fun and enjoyment, it's something I've always wanted to do. I don't expect to go anywhere with it other than enjoy it - which I am. Thanks for reading my little story so far.


     
  2. Rapier

    Rapier Forte User

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    Jul 18, 2011
    UK
    Try Forscore for your ipad. You can put all your sheet music on it and have it wherever you are. Also look for Pops McLoughlin' s updated Arban music book to down load. Lots of great practice routines. You might have to pay for them and being a Yorkshireman that goes against your nature, but worth the money.
     
  3. Old Bugle Boy

    Old Bugle Boy Pianissimo User

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    Jan 8, 2015
    North Yorkshire

    Thanks, I'll check those out .. if my arms will reach the bottom of my pockets ..lol ..
    Alan
     
  4. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Jan 9, 2010
    East Yorkshire
    Hmm I wonder who recommended the John Packer.......

    I think you are on the right track in terms of practice. I would suggest you take a look at this, as a Yorkshire type the price is right and as Arban is often expensive and we don't see second hand copies that often over here. Down load the segments rather than the complete book for ease of reading (There are two different editions on here).

    Method for the Cornet (Arban, Jean-Baptiste) - IMSLP/Petrucci Music Library: Free Public Domain Sheet Music

    The final section contains solos, duets and some simple tunes which can be a lot of fun. Practice the duets and if you like I might take a trip to Brompton and wake the village one Sunday morning later in the year.

    Cheers

    A
     
  5. Old Bugle Boy

    Old Bugle Boy Pianissimo User

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    Jan 8, 2015
    North Yorkshire
    Yes Andy, can't think who it was that recommended the John Packer. Thanks for the positive support (we new boys need a lot of it) and for leads, I'll follow up on them.
    Regards..Alan
     
  6. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Jul 5, 2010
    Vienna, Austria, Europe
    Well, that's all very good news! Only be careful not to overdo practising at first - we don't want a Lip Overstrain Syndrome in a comebacker!

    You might also look at some of the German trumpet methods, the foremost being the one by Richard Stegemann. Forget the text which is outmoded and in German to boot; but the routines are excellent.

    And here's one for the road:

    Finally, they have discovered the origins of Yorkshiremen. They are descended from Scots exiled for their meanness. (sorry, had to put that one in.)

    And as you said something about not reaching the bottom of your pockets...:

    A Yorkshire laddie at school is asked by the teacher: "Now, if you have four pounds in your left hand trouser pocket, and two fifty in your right, what would you have?" -
    "Somebody else's trousers!"
    The teacher, unabashed, tries again to din some sense into the lad. "Well, new try. If you have ten pounds, and I ask you for five, how much would you have?" -
    "Ten pounds, sir."
     
  7. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Jan 13, 2015
    London
    Keep it up Sargent :D
     
  8. Old Bugle Boy

    Old Bugle Boy Pianissimo User

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    Ha! Very good Barliman - can't get enough of Yorkshiremen jokes keep 'em coming. Thanks for the leads too ..
    Alan
     
  9. Old Bugle Boy

    Old Bugle Boy Pianissimo User

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    Jan 8, 2015
    North Yorkshire
    Many thanks - how did know I was a Sergeant?
    Alan
     
  10. Old Bugle Boy

    Old Bugle Boy Pianissimo User

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    Jan 8, 2015
    North Yorkshire
    Many thanks - how did you know I was a Sergeant? lol ..
    Alan
     

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