New mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by erockent, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. erockent

    erockent New Friend

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    Dec 8, 2008
    I am looking into purchasing a new mouthpiece for marching band.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. gbdeamer

    gbdeamer Forte User

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    Oct 16, 2008
    What's wrong with your current mouthpiece?
     
  3. bilboinsa

    bilboinsa Piano User

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    Jan 24, 2006
    San Antonio, TX
    The last reply isn't a smart-alleck remark....it is important. Why do you want a replacement? Is yours all banged and cut up? Why not just replace it with a new one the same size?

    If you are marching in a very cold area, some players like the Kelly mouthpieces--they are made of plastic.

    Good luck.
     
  4. erockent

    erockent New Friend

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    Dec 8, 2008
    Im on a bach 10c. I am originally a saxophone player, so i take the advice of my fellow band members to try to upgrade to try new mouthpieces for a better or different tone.
     
  5. PSH

    PSH Pianissimo User

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    Feb 20, 2007
    Minneapolis MN; Denton TX
    There is no mouthpiece that will give you either of those things. If what you have works, keep it.
     
  6. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    It is generally but not totaly accepted that ideally one should work up to the largest mouthpiece they can handle.The best time to do this is dureing the summer assumeing you have no performances dureing the summer. I think a good goal is to be able to use a 1 1/2 Bach C, 3C and 5C almost anyone can use a super small shallow cup like the 10C but it limits your ability to play loud and full at both the top and bottom of the register. Oh lead trumpet players like 1st chair normal use a smaller then average mouth piece as well. Usually commercial artist doing lot's of jingles or studio work daily and people that spend a lot of time in the upper register and play a lot.

    I am going to assume you are on a budget. If Kelly is still haveing their Mello-Yello sale they have a deal where you buy any three of their yello mouth pieces for $33. That works out to $11 per mouthpiece. THey are made from Lexan the same plastic like material that bullet resistant glass is made from also known as poly-carbonate. This means that it is not going to get as cold in the winter time out side when marching around as a alloy methpiece does. I would prob. recomend you get a Bach 1C 3B and 5C. This way you can play around with different sizes stepping down slowly. Once you find what you like I would recomend you save up and give Picket Brass a try. They have been wounderfull to me and my son. They will make you what ever you want if their stock selection is not what you desire. They can alter your old mouthpiece if you decide you like a different rim profile and they have a system of interchangable top's and back bores so you can mix and match top's and back bores to have what ever you need.

    In fact have you tried different mouthpieces from your fellow trumpet player's? Borrow some and just wash them with anti-bacterial soap and some rubbing alchol and then rinse with water. When you are done do the same thing. I do not think you need to boil them or anything like that but people seem to be awfuly Germ phobic today. When I was a kid we just used the end of our shirt and wiped them out real fast and gave them a test drive. In fact shareing of cork grease, slide grease, pop and chapstick was so common in band that we often used to joke and tell people that we had kissed such and such after useing someone else's chapstick etc........

    Most music store's will let you try a mouth piece before you buy it they just clean them after wards and put them backin the box.
     
  7. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

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  8. lovevixen555

    lovevixen555 Banned

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    Yes, OZ but is a generalization but it is not dangerious or reckless. Anyone can go smaller after working up to a more practical size but the reverse is not usualy true. Someone that needs a small shallow mouthpiece in order to play inthe upper register is useing a crutch to make up for week underdeveloped chop's. Someone who plays all day or for long hours at a time like a professional has different needs working in a recording studio all day or playing on tour. Usualy these same guys did not start out with the mouth pieces they made famious either. That is like looking at what a professional body building does for a workout at the top of his career versus what he did to get to that point to begin with. Totaly different things. In fact prior to about the last 30 year's you did not routinely see such an abundence of small shallow mouthpieces. They where around but not the bread and butter of the trumpet world like today. They are fine for lead and recording studio and playing upper register but you could never play the bulk of Orchastra work with them! ON top of that they are an extension of the leadpipe and bell so the back bore has to work withthe rest of the trumpet in addition to the cup and rim shape working for the player. A Bach 10 is like a dime with a hole in it. He is drasticly hurting his development by useing such a small mouthpiece at this point in his development. If he goes to a music store they are going to know less then most people on this site seriously most music stores are dumb when it comes to brasswind mouthpieces. They are nice and mean well but will probably sell you what they have in stock and what is popular. I had to go directly to the sales staff at three different mouthpiece manuafactures talk ont he phone and exchange emails to get solid advice. In all case's it was the oposite of what the local big chain music stores said! So id doubt he is going to get better advice at a music store then on here even if the advice disagree's with mine at least most of the time it is comeing from experince and passionate people that actualy play the trumpet.

    In fact just the other day I gave a new my son a Yamaha 14B4. I did not like it so I figured what the heck I will let the kid try his old one and this one and see what one he picks. He likes the Yamaha 14B4. He is 10 and was useing a Reynolds 7A prior to that. He has been playing for a few months since school started up. If not for someone on this board mentioning that hey "Kids his age start on Trombone mouth pieces and those are huge and they do not negatively affect their chops why go small on the trumpet?" if you stop and think about it the largest trumpet mouth pieces is tiny compared to the smallest trombone mouthpieces and Ihave yet to see a trumpet mouthpiece as deep as a french horns mouthpiece.

    In fact my son is getting better and better with each passing day. I was a little bit nervious about that big of a jump from a Reynolds 7A to a Yamaha 14B4 but I figured trying it could not hurt anything. The guy who gave me his reasoning was right on the money.If a 10 year old can make a seemless transition I am sure a young man can. For crying out loud most people start with a 7C this young man is useing a 10C. He might as well take a dime poke a hole in the middle of it and solder it directly to his trumpet. Their is no way he can play loud and powerful at both end's of the register with full bodied sound. His mouthpiece will not physicaly allow it. I am sure his responce time is good and his attack is great. With that much air comeing back and reinforceing the lips I am sure it is also very easy to play.

    Try out what the kids in your band have! If you find something better go to ebay if you do not want something from Kelly but for marching band the lexan rocks. Their is a guy that sells Yamaha mouthpieces the standard models. He sells nothing but new ones factory direct right to you. He has pdf charts that you click on the ebay page to compare what you liked to what is close to that from Yamaha. He chrages $29 and I think $2.49 to ship. Other places want $40+ and $12.95 to ship this tiny little mouthpiece to you that you might not even like. Music stores have a bad selection they either only carry one or two brands or they only keep the popular hot seller's in stock. I still picket brass is the best choice once you have an idea of what you like but do not waste big money just finding out.
     
  9. ozboy

    ozboy Mezzo Forte User

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    Australia
    I play a Monette. I rang and talked to the people at monette about my mouthpiece needs. There are many companies eg Stork, GR etc that offer a similar service.
    The idea is not to go bigger for the sake of going bigger, it is about finding the mouthpiece that allows you to express yourself musically in the manner you desire.
    Clifford Brown played on a thimble. A bucket cup is not for everyone.
    It might work out for this guy going bigger but rather than go on a mouthpiece safari where he spends a heap, he might be able to get some advice that will save him some grief, time and money. Even if the guy has to spend a bit of dosh and get a lesson from soemone who can look at him play and assess from there.
     
  10. willbarber

    willbarber Piano User

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    Nov 22, 2008
    Medina, NY
    Kelly now have the white ones on sale, which IMHO look better than the yellow ones.
     

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