New or Old, which is better?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Trumpet Dreamer, Nov 14, 2010.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

    5,065
    1,005
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon
    The "old" category also has the advantage of retrospective. Over many years players compare notes as it were and legendary horns are identified, and great years of the big manufacturers .... Years from now they will be talking about the horns being built today and sticking them in these kinds of categories.

    For this reason, a sharp buyer can wade through massive amounts of literature .... take a look at what legendary players were playing what horns from the past, etc. and keep an eye out for them. Good deals are available most of the time on old horns if you look. GOOD LUCK to the buyer of a brand new horn that's only been around for a few years in getting an idea from others about its quality. Just advertising and present day word of mouth, no benefit of many years of consideration.

    On the other hand, if those legendary players from the past, no longer with us, were picking a horn today ........ what would they choose now? Probably Monettes and Taylors and Callichios.:dontknow:

    Turtle
     
  2. chet fan

    chet fan Piano User

    284
    16
    Jul 3, 2009
    New definately new

    I have one vintage 60+ years old, and each and every time I play it I get sick, because when I inhale I inhale some air from the trumpet too (ideally you should inhale only through nose- if you can do that than go on vintage cannot harm you) but I cant and theefore I inhale 60+ years of bacteriea and viruses

    And I clean it, with detergent, and vinegear and all that stuff, but that smell (old bacteriae and viruses) just wont go away
     
  3. Trumpet Dreamer

    Trumpet Dreamer Mezzo Forte User

    733
    33
    Aug 14, 2010
    Jazz Town, USA
    This is an interesting perspective. Let's look at some highly respected modern era players, such as Wayne Bergeron, Eric Miyashiro, Arturo Sandoval, Clark Terry, Roger Ingram, Mike Vax, Bobby Shew, and a regular contributor to this forum, Keith Fiala. We all know the trumpets they are playing today. Perhaps in time these will be considered highly valued instruments and collectors will seek them out.

    And yes, old stuff tends to have the intangible aura of character.
    But old is not always better, and there are a lot of people who long for a certain nostalgia, and this can artificially inflate the value.

    Another example...while my favorite Corvette is a '67 big block rag top, a new model will run circles around it, in more ways than you can count!
    And my favorite airplane??? A North American P-51 Mustang with a Rolls Royce Merlin engine built by the Packard Motor Company...good ol' American engineering at it's best, and no, they don't make them like they used to!
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  4. SteveRADavey

    SteveRADavey Pianissimo User

    156
    1
    May 25, 2010
    Austin, TX
    Then you aren't cleaning it well enough. Are you putting it back into a nasty old case after you clean it?
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,417
    7,543
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    I second Steve's comment. I have an old 80A that stunk to high heaven and would leave that "taste" in your mouth even though I never put my mouth on the horn, just the mpc. You need to really soak it, not just for a few hours but maybe days! Extreme? Yes! Effective? Very! And , it doesn't cost you anything to let it soak. Rinse with hot tap water and air dry. Do this until the "smell" is gone and you should not have any problems. Put a air freshener in the case AND spray with Lysol to kill the bacteria that causes odor (sounds like a commercial :lol::lol:). DO NOT SOAK THE VALVES!!! You will ruin the felts.

    TD, I like the car analogy but don't know if it can be applied broadly to vintage instruments. Martin Committees are arguably one of the finest jazz horns made along with Bach Strads from the same era for classical. That is why they command such high prices and custom makers try to emulate their sound. Old isn't always better, but it is always proven, good or bad.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2010
  6. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

    5,065
    1,005
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon
    I agree with tobylou8 about the car analogy ..... There are no pro horns today that are blowing away the great horns of the past, unless the laws of physics have changed.

    Turtle
     
  7. Trumpet Dreamer

    Trumpet Dreamer Mezzo Forte User

    733
    33
    Aug 14, 2010
    Jazz Town, USA
    Agreed indeed!
     
  8. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

    5,065
    1,005
    Jun 6, 2010
    Oregon
    Best thing about buying a new horn? Everything works right.

    No $100+ for new braces and dent removal (the Getzen), no sticky 1st and 2nd valves needing attention (unknown $ amount... the Conn), or no way to adjust any slides in the design while you're playing (the '24 Martin, I want to install a 1st slide trigger for unknown $). :shock:

    Buying old horns is an adventure.

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  9. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,417
    7,543
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    Not always. Read my post on "something I can't figure out". Shocking. Truly shocking! :lol:
     
  10. Trumpet Dreamer

    Trumpet Dreamer Mezzo Forte User

    733
    33
    Aug 14, 2010
    Jazz Town, USA
    Yes, the old, yet current production horn I bought required $$$ to get into shape. I could have bought a better (new) horn for the same total investment.

    It's not just a horn, it's an adventure!
     

Share This Page