"New" Pieces for Trumpet

Discussion in 'EC Downloading' started by mikeblutman, Oct 20, 2005.

  1. mikeblutman

    mikeblutman New Friend

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    Jul 17, 2005
    The purpose of this post is to get Mr. Carroll's and others' opinions on transcriptions. As some of you might have read in the "college auditions" section, I have cited the use of transcriptions of vocal literature to boost my musical development.

    Do you advocate the use of transcription as a musical development tool in your teaching much, Mr. Carroll? What can be some advantages or disadvantages in your opinion of the use of such material instead of or in conjunction with more standard trumpet material (etudes, solos, etc)?

    Thanks,
    Mike Blutman
     
  2. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    Hi Mike,

    Please......it's Ed, okay?

    Do I advocate the transcription of vocal music in my studio(s)? No, but I don't see anything wrong with it aside from the fact that we lose the text -- the key element in vocal phrasing. Mozart, for example, usually followed 4 or 8 bar phrases when writing instrumental melody. This isn't always the case in an aria. That said, two of my students played vocal works (R. Strauss, Rachmaninov, somebody else(?) ) in recitals last year.

    I believe that long, singing lines are fabulous to study. The many vocalises (Bordogni, Concone, etc.) that we commonly look at are a testament to this. You should also investigate the individual accompanied vocalise-etudes by composers such as Messiaen, Milhaud, Satie, Tailleferre, Poulenc, Faure, and others compiled by Hettich. Great stuff and you don't have to know French!

    Best and keep posting. I'll keep watching here and chime in again.
    EC
     
  3. mikeblutman

    mikeblutman New Friend

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    Jul 17, 2005
    Dear Ed and all TMers,

    The fact that you lose the text in a transcription is one of the more exciting parts of performing vocal literature I find. In studying the text, phrasing, and diction of the languages, I find that I am challenged to be more creative with my tone color.

    For instance, this week I've been looking at Ravel's setting of the Jewish memorial prayer, the Kaddish. I've heard this prayer recited, chanted, sung, etc in temple for as long as I can remember and have a very clear conception of the diction. This greatly affects my approach to this piece. I see that as a positive aspect of the study of vocal literature rather than a detraction. While an instrumentalist cannot ever express the text fully through purely instrumental means, it sure is fun trying! I often have an actor friend read the poems before each song in performance (also not a bad idea for endurance concerns ... grab a minute between songs! Sorry for reverting back to my trumpet jock roots there).

    Responses?

    Sincerely,
    Mike B
     
  4. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    Mike,

    I agree absolutely with you concerning attempting to deliver text via color. It's not the same, obviously, but it's what we can do since speaking and playing simultaneously is an extended technique far too extended! I also enjoy your idea of having a narrator recite the text (in the original language) prior to starting. Anything that engages the listener to consider all of the layers of the composition is useful in making a concert memorable.

    Also, TMers, please note the quality of the composers mentioned so far in this discussion. . . and we've only scratched the surface.

    Comments from the rest of you?

    Best wishes and keep contributing musical topics, Mike. They're a welcomed relief.
    EC
     
  5. CGUM

    CGUM Pianissimo User

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    Aug 5, 2005
    Hi MB and EC,


    Thanks for bringing up this topic. It's given me some ideas for a program that I'm putting together. I think from frogpeak publication (?) I saw a composition based on poems by Bertold Brecht and I think I might have to investigate that.

    We'll see where this goes,
    CG

    P.S.

    I have heard Zony play Queens "Love of My Life" and I swear he sounded like Freddie Mercury.
     
  6. mikeblutman

    mikeblutman New Friend

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    Jul 17, 2005
    Dear Ed, readers, and contributers,

    Thank you, Ed, for drawing our attention to the quality of the composers of whom we're speakinig (Strauss, Ravel, etc.). We, as transcription-friendly musicians, have at our disposal literally thousands of art songs by the great composers of the past and present.

    How many trumpet recitals have you seen that include the following composers on the same program: Schoenberg, Webern, Berg, and Mahler? How about: Copland, Carter, Bernstein, and Gershwin? Those sets of composers were the chosen composers of two of my more successful half-recitals last year.

    It makes me frustrated when trumpet recitals turn into purely athletic events ... the kind where if the trumpeter is still standing at the end, it's a success in the eyes of fellow trumpeters! Why did we decide to pursue MUSIC in the first place? It was because we love MUSIC, right?

    Does anyone have ideas for other themed half or full recitals?

    Have any of you checked out Ray Mase's "Trumpet Vocalise" CD (amazing playing from Mr. Mase)? What do you think of his comments in the liner notes that a vocalise is a better way to go than a song with text because you lose too much by taking away the text? What if you provide the text as I have suggested earlier with a reader before each song? Ed touched on this in an earlier reply.

    Thanks,
    Mike Blutman
     
  7. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    Jul 13, 2005
    NY/CA
    Mike,

    Thanks for keeping this thread alive.

    The most important consideration in your choice of repertoire is that you're performing music that turns YOU on. Leave the argument about text vs. vocalise to others. It has been my experience that we always play the music that makes the hair stand up on the back of our necks far better than, well, music that doesn't (and I can give you a looooooong list of common trumpet repertoire that falls into catagory "B").

    I'd love others to chime in here...

    Best,
    EC (yes, the Tate/Strauss disc that you mention is me. Thank you)
     
  8. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    Mike,

    You might enjoy a post that I wrote on the Trumpet Herald web site called Don’t Drop the Ashtray. I’m amazed at how differently I approach a piece of music when I’ve considered the vocal interpretation as well as the actual diction. In one of the pieces that Cecelia Bartoli performs on the CD that I mention in that thread, she sings the words “Pah so ray aylo†(sorry, this is phonetic as I don’t know the Italian and I don’t have the words available to me right now). When she gets to the word that begins with Pah, there is a very strong accent that is dictated by the lyrics, but is not printed in the part. When that line is repeated with different lyrics (without the strong P sound), there is no accent.

    If I were to hear that piece without the accent, I would think, “there’s something missing there!†David Krauss discussed this in detail at his talk at the ITG conference in Denver. One of these day’s I’m going to finish putting together my synopsis of that part of his presentation.

    Great topic!
     
  9. pwillini

    pwillini Pianissimo User

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    Mar 4, 2004
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Stop and think a minute about a gospel trumpeter (as I am trying to be). We play hymns and favorites that everyone knows the words to! As I play in church, I think of the message the words speak then use that as to color the way I play! I do it every Sunday!

    I recently played, soli, a hymn called "His Eye Is On the Sparrow" for a fellow trumpeter's funeral. It was his favorite song. Don't think, for one minute, that his family didn't sing the words, in their heads, as I played. I watched them closely and could tell!

    The message is not just the words, it's the music as well. They all go together. As a musician, to try and separate them is a disservice to the composer and lyricist. Play them as you sing them, that's what I do!
     
  10. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    Jul 13, 2005
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    pwill,

    I have no personal connection to gospel music, but you make a compelling
    point. Thank you :-)

    EC
     

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