New trumpet, old Arban!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Aussie Matt, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    Great to hear about those who practice from Arban's. My first copy I got as a junior in HS finally fell apart while I was in college after a few soakings in the rain and I discarded it. On my comeback in 2006, I bought a new Platinum Edition.

    I still remember my parent's original phone number in Carnegie PA (US) as was only 4 digits as later added BR for BRowning, and such was even before the rotary dial phone.
    Too, later, Carnegie PA was one of the first 2 communities to be equipped with Bell system Touch Tone phones, a variant as are still mostly used presently. What really fascinates me is that I have two pictures framed in Chicago IL where the framer's label also reflects only a 4 digit phone number. Shucks, now some phones allow one just to call the person you wish to reach just by voice (assuming you've pre-programmed them into your phone). Yes, I also remember the older 6 volt battery powered phone my grandmother once had that you just cranked to get the operator who would then connect you to the party you were calling. Amazing communication advances in my life, and I seldom now give much thought to such.
     
  2. Aussie Matt

    Aussie Matt Pianissimo User

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    Oct 12, 2010
    Yeah Ed, phone's still spin me out. I was sitting in a hotel room in Bangladesh recently talking to my wife and kids in Sydney, Australia on my mobile phone in real time. Pretty darn amazing really when you stop and consider it. And then, I'm typing this on a laptop, that's actually on my lap, and I'm not connected to anything – battery power and Apple Airport connection.
    I wonder how trumpets have changed over the past 50 or so years: materials, build quality, intonation etc. Perhaps there's the makings of a new thread.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    What a lot of us fail to remember is that during WWII, the US had a strategic metals program, and sadly many brass musical instruments came out of closets only to be converted to such as brass shell munitions casings ... not unlike the former adage of plowshares prior being converted into swords.

    To my memory and study, since the development of piston valves, first with 2, and then 3 and some now with 4, I can't discern much developmental innovations of a trumpet or other brass horn with the exception of a Thayer valve to change the key of some trombones. Yes, many older cornets/trumpets came with crooks that changed the key of the instrument.

    Aside from my present Schilke P5-4 piccolo trumpet and possibly my Conn Artist recording euphonium, the closest I've ever come to a professional instrument was my then new Martin trumpet as upgraded my prior used Pitt-American (stencil) that were both "lost" by an ex-wife while I was in USAF. Was my Martin a Commitee or a Handcraft, I don't know ... but I really liked it. Now all I can do is look at pictures and read specs of what is now referred to as professional instruments and I do not have the money, or really the desire to acquire such as I've no intent to become a professional performer as a prime vocation. If an older one is teaching the younger, to demonstrate with a professional instrument is unfair to those who can only afford the student quality as is the upper end of what most public schools provide or most students acquire ... allowing for exception. Within a year or two when I regain my capability to play at a level of prior ability , I'll make do and enjoy my mostly student quality instruments and look but not touch the pros.

    P.S. I personally knew Robert Walker whose Bell team developed the Touch Tone phone system.
    Too, he invented the technology as to convert the polarity of vehicles and use an alternator to improve mobile radio for first responders ... no more dragging a grounding strap. In those earlier days, prior an All Points Bulletin pre-empted commercial broadcasts and everyone (including the offenders) heard the police.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2011

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