New Trumpeter Question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BigBandBandy, Mar 26, 2009.

  1. Ed Kennedy

    Ed Kennedy Forte User

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    Nov 18, 2006
    Be sure to rest as much as you play. Don't beat up your chops. If you can find it, Leon Merion's Trumpet Isometrics (try Brasswind and Woodwind) has a great text section which may answer many of your questions as well as a bunch of good exercises. I like the Walter Smith Flexibilities. I think they are easier to get into than the Colin Advanced Flexibilities. I would second the recommendation for the Clark's Technical Studies, practiced exactly according to the text.
     
  2. operagost

    operagost Forte User

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    Jan 25, 2009
    Spring City, PA, USA
    Just a note, BigBandBandy, the middle C on trumpet is on the third space. You said something in one of your posts that indicated you might think it was the C on the first ledger below the staff. There isn't another (legit) C below that one :-P
     
  3. SpiritDCI08

    SpiritDCI08 Piano User

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    Feb 11, 2009
    Fort Campbell, KY
    Focus on Long Tones, Lip Slurs, and Scales
    Long Tones and Slurs are essencial to progress, focus on clean transitions and good tone quality. Sit in front of a tuner to make sure you are doing good.
    Scales will help because not only will you be learing to read higher. You are learning to play higher too. My instuctors tell me even if the scale is known as an one octave scale keep going up until you can't reach any higher. This will help alot, it has done me wonders.
     
  4. BigBandBandy

    BigBandBandy New Friend

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    Mar 26, 2009
    Illinois
    I had no idea that middle C on trumpet was the 3rd space. Maybe that's why everyone thinks I was too concerned about playing really high! LOL, that's funny. Thanks everyone for all the great tips and advice.
     
  5. Snorglorf

    Snorglorf Pianissimo User

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    Nov 13, 2008
    On my first day playing, i could hit B, C, D, E, F (starting below the staff).

    I've been playing for a year and a half or so and I'm just starting to get the Bb, B and C above the staff solid.

    Lessons helped WAY more than I could imagine. I kicked myself the other week when I picked up the Clarke studies for not picking them up earlier. Their usefulness cannot be overstated

    Spend a lot of time on slurs and long tones to develop range, but don't think that doing ONLY slurs and long tones will help your range faster. In fact it's been better for me in terms of range since I started playing them less and started playing music more.

    Also get your teacher (when you get one if you don't already have one) to show you some pedal tone exercises.
     
  6. thebugleboy

    thebugleboy Pianissimo User

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    Dec 10, 2008
    Deep South
    Please take this advice as helpful and constructive, not negatively critical. A note, no matter how high is nothing. Only the music, interpreted and performed well, is worthy. Strive for full range, full tonal quality (many tonal qualities are required), presicion intonation, etc., but if your range allows you to perform very well in two octaves, and if the score calls only for what you can give well, you can be a complete success with this chart. Range will come with dedication and steady practice with a strong method. Your technique is as important (or more important than) as range. I have known some fine professionals whose range didn't blossom until after they were already pretty well established in ensembles. For a musician work never ceases. A musician never "makes it." If he/she stops practicing on the instrument, the instrument begins to respond less and less. Soon (very soon) the public will begin to notice the difference.
     
  7. thebugleboy

    thebugleboy Pianissimo User

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    Dec 10, 2008
    Deep South
    Listen closely to Arturo Sandoval. Sure he can hit any note he wants, but listen to his intonation, interpretation, phrasing, etc. I had a great time in college with my instrumental dept. head. He and I were great friends, and he pushed me hard. He taught me much and introduced me to many professionals who gave much advice. But "Doc" always told me that if I could not command (not DEMAND!) a note and control it at any volume level, in any type of phrasing, with perfect intonation, and with any required tonal quality (bright, dark, etc.) that note would not be considered within my playing range, and I was NOT to be heard using it in public, even in public practice. This made things difficult, but my range began to soar. And with the range came a musical ability that I didn't realize I could find. He had me concentrating on my tasks that I COULD perform well, and alone in private I worked away at the things that would get me to the next higher chair. I have been known to work on one note in a score for so long that my friends were ready to turn on me if I didn't quit. Steady, relentless dedication. If you work it, it will come.
     
  8. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 13, 2007
    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    I've been able to hit a high G within a year when I was in high school. But you see, once you reach the high G, you aim at the high C, then high E, DHG, DHC...

    It never ends.

    But if you keep trying, it's rewarding.
     
  9. BigBandBandy

    BigBandBandy New Friend

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    Mar 26, 2009
    Illinois
    Snorglorf, thanks for the reply. Which Clarke studies should I start with, I noticed there is about 2 or 3 different ones? Or should I just get all of them?

    thebugleboy, all advice is taken constructively and appreciated! Thanks for taking the time to thoughtfully reply. I'm beginning to see the value of this forum and all the helpful support from everyone here. Thanks.

    brem, nice work on your progress. When did you hit the H? Just kidding. Thanks for the reply.
     
  10. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    Sep 13, 2007
    Quebec City, QC, Canada
    Clarke Studies is one booklet with all the studies inside.

    I am currently doing Studies 1, 2 and 3... still haven't completely mastered them all.

    big band: still struggling with the high E, so high H is far fetched ( hee hee )
     

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