no mouthpiece buzz

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by morganiser, Feb 16, 2014.

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  1. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Zygomatic arch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia FYI
     
  2. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    But just think how much better she could be if only she could free buzz. :-)

    (just kidding)

    Mike
     
  3. DaTrump

    DaTrump Forte User

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    I have found two common issues that plague players that can't mouthpiece buzz, it isn't an end all but it was helped many kids I have taught.

    1. A mouthpiece is much less resistant than your horn, using more air usually proves beneficial. Most players naturally will adjust to use the correct amount of air once it goes into the horn.

    2. You are focusing too hard on making your lips buzz and not on producing a buzz. IE Direct vs. Indirect action.
    If I think just about making my lips buzz, my buzz, if there at all, is weak and fleeting. If I focus on doing the actions to create a buzz (forming and embouchure and pushing air through it) my buzz becomes stronger and more in tune.



    On another note, number 2 is applicable in other places, such as making music. If you focus too hard on crescendo here, marcato there, the music you make is mechanical but if you say, I want this to sound like this, it leads to freer and stylistic music.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I would love to buzz Tine!
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    OMG, I don't mouthpiece buzz. I must have the Plague!!!
     
  6. morganiser

    morganiser New Friend

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    many thanks for all your replies. Much to think about and put into practice.
     
  7. morganiser

    morganiser New Friend

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    That all makes sense. Many thanks.
     
  8. jengstrom

    jengstrom Pianissimo User

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    We can't make the lips buzz; we allow them to. They're just flapping in the breeze. To do that, the aperture has to be in the correct position and relaxed so that when the air passes through the aperture, a vibration is induced. Since there is no back pressure with just the mouthpiece (well, very little) and there is noticeable back pressure caused by the standing wave in the horn, buzzing a mouthpiece with a horn is very different than buzzing a mouthpiece without it.

    That doesn't mean mouthpiece buzzing can't be done or that it's not beneficial. I do not wish to start a pro/con discussion on mouthpiece buzzing. However, if this is something you want to cultivate, I recommend James Thompson's Buzzing Basics book. It's available through Hickey's Music in Ithaca, NY.

    Good luck.

    -John
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It doesn't help. You need to buzz on your own for a while to get any "recognition".......
     
  10. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    This is not quite right.

    The lips open and close like a switch, it is like a balloon full of air and we stretch the opening to get a squeal. The default state is closed, there is enough air pressure to let a puff through by overcoming the tension of the stretched opening. If we are careful, we can change the pitch of the balloon by changing the tension of the stretch.

    Buzzing on a mouthpiece is essentially the same except we have an opportunity to increase tension by puckering instead of stretching. I use the mouthpiece in the car or in a hotel room when playing is impossible.

    The standing wave in the horn does not increase backpressure. That DC component of playing is "leakage" and allows us to breath at regular intervals. The standing wave induces the AC component and even works without moving air. I glued a headphone transducer to a mouthpiece and tested it. In this case no airflow was necessary and the standing wave/trumpettone came out just fine. When we learn to play the horns resonance instead of trying to make the horn do something that it is not made for, everything gets a lot easier.

    Actually when buzzing on the mouthpiece, the lips can be in free air, anywhere on the mouthpiece or representing our "standard" position. The benefits during the lessons that I give are blood flow, breathing control and ear training. I consider them optional and go into no technical description whatsoever.


     

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