no pressure adaptor

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BrotherBACH, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    Oct 5, 2010
    Greetings,

    I would like to focus the topic on the no pressure adaptor, and “not” on the topic of mouth piece pressure itself. I want to read peoples experiences using the device to determine whether or not I am willing to “plunk” down good money on a potential gimmick.

    I practice once a week with a fairly accomplished music student who has noticed that sometimes I do use pressure above the stave while at other time it seems very easy and effortless. I have also notice that I am in a holding pattern with respect to endurance which my friend has also notice may be a function of using too much pressure.

    I all honesty when I am in the moment of paying I do not realize when I am applying excessive pressure. All I am looking for is a way to get feedback and make me aware so I can eventually recognize the signs on my own and use only “sufficient” pressure.

    Thanks,

    BrotherBACH
     
  2. Pete Anderson

    Pete Anderson Pianissimo User

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    I could be remembering wrong but I believe it was Dave Hickman who said neither he nor any of his students could play a decent G above the staff using one of those "no pressure" mouthpieces. Take that as you will... I can think of some situations where it might be helpful but my own opinion is that, for the most part, it's probably a relatively useless gimmick. But maybe you can try it out and prove me wrong!

    You probably already know this but I thought it might be useful to add... Different embouchure types, range and dynamics require different amounts of pressure. An adapter doesn't take those things into consideration. Maybe some people could play a forte G on it, but maybe due to the way your embouchure works you can only play an E, and that doesn't necessarily mean you're doing something wrong. Just something to be aware of if you decide to try this out.

    I could see it being useful if you wrote down what range/dynamics you can play on the adapter when you're at your best, and you could then use it to measure when things are starting to not work at their best. For instance, you could measure that you can play a loud E when your chops are fresh. Now you use the adapter when doing your Clarke studies and you find that it's cutting you off at around C in the staff - maybe it's time to take a break and come back later.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
  3. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    Oct 5, 2010
    Thanks Pete. That information is great to know.

    BrotherBACH
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The idea that pressure is bad is flawed. Pressure works (well, up to a point anyway). To keep pressure at an acceptable level, we need to train our breathing and practice enough for face muscle, tongue, breathing, ear, brain coordination/integration.

    The only thing a pressure adapter does is force us to twist some other aspect of our playing to get results. That usually means worse face and tongue habits.

    I consider it a sure fire way to really mess ones playing up.
     
  5. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Save the money and simply rest the valve casing on your left palm. Holding the horn in place through gravity alone. No right hand touching horn at all. Ascend with no valves. Strive for a solid m/f to forte High E natural

    Squeaking above to fourth ledger line G or whatever you can also helpful. This is not a warm up. Like free buzz and pencil exercise/P.E.T.E. it is very strenuous so don't use it every day. Every other or maybe just twice a week.

    The goal isn't to eliminate arm pressure but to


    1. Learn how much arm you're currently using.

    2. Develop endurance and register.

    3. Learn to reduce arm pressure in practice and performance.




    I will still use occasional heavy arm pressure but only for really loud phrases when near the end of a gig. By only rarely resorting to significant pressure it is impossible to hurt myself. or degrade my performances in the following days.

    Arm pressure is just a tool. Use less often or rarely. Still handy though.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2011
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Is this the one?

    Browsing Store - Pressure Adapter, Trumpet

    For that kinda money, I would take a few lessons from an accomplished teacher ( or buy mouthpieces! ;-) ). Nothing against students, but sometimes they are just "parroting" what they heard another say.

    Here's a fun link to all kinds of practice gizmos.

    Practice Adapters - Thomann UK Cyberstore

    "potential gimmick", looks like a duck, walks like a duck, quacks like a duck... . Just sayin'... .
     
  7. BrotherBACH

    BrotherBACH Piano User

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    Oct 5, 2010
    Thanks for the advice so far from all of you. The no pressure adapter shown in the tobylou8 link is one and the same. The summary from the advice I am getting is to train myself to become aware and adjust accordingly. When I look at the other link, I was amazed at how many training aids there are for the trumpet. According to the principle of "specificity of training", I am not sure what good anything of them are. To get good at trumpet you have to learn to coordinate many subsystems that can only be learned when playing the trumpet. I guess the same could be said for the no pressure adaptor.

    Interesting thing is that one of my teachers really believes in the P.E.T.E.

    BrotherBACH
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I do use the original metal B.E.R.P. and it has been good when driving on the way to playing since I like to warm up. I can't speak to the plastic B.E.R.P.. I also use a hose-a-horn with a newly acquired bell generously donated by the local music store. It is good in the car, but you're limited to bugle or baroque type of playing. Probably the cheapest "utensil" you can use is a pencil. The pencil exercise has some merit but not as a substitute for playing. I was trying to find the link to a "no pressure " device with a big honking spring on it. It reminded me of a pogo stick!! I have adapted two rules about pressure: 1- If I can feel my teeth, too much. 2- If my lips hurt/intense pain, too much. Then all I have to do is ask myself, "Is that note worth it"? :lol:
     
  9. A.N.A. Mendez

    A.N.A. Mendez Utimate User

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    [​IMG]

    Here's the ticket!
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    That might be it! Although the one I "remember" attached to the leadpipe I think and it was upwards of $200. But yeah, that's the basic idea. How much?? ;-)
     

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