Notes Below The Staff

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by xjb0906, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    I am in a constant quest to improve all aspects of my playing. The jobs that I get are varied and require me to develop many styles of playing and most the commonly used range of the instrument. I need some ideas on why my low notes below low C are flat and less resonant than I would like. Teachers have never mentioned it , but I know about it and want to fix it. I am not financially able nor will my schedule allow me to study with a teacher at the moment. I have spent plenty of time with the tuner trying different things with no luck. What generally causes the lower notes to be flat and less resonant? I have tinkered with varying the tightness of the corners and tongue level with no luck. Any serious and helpful comments will be appreciated.
     
  2. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    With a Bb trumpet I'll assume you are reaching for a C on the ledger line below the treble (G) clef and heavily and excessively using and reliant on a chromatic tuner. Thereby, you bet, you'll be a tone flat on a C and all the other notes you play and that additional to the cold here in NC as require slide adjustments. To realize this play that C as if it were a D above and your chromatic tuner should display it as a C. Yeah, very few buyers of a chromatic tuner realize their display is only for instruments pitched in the concert key of C a tone higher than your Bb instrument, thereby to compensate and match the tuner's display you've got to transpose and play a tone higher.

    I sight read this transposition on my Bb instruments from piano music as are written for instruments pitched in the concert key of C.

    Certainly ear training and recognition of tones is an asset.
     
  4. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Your experience is probably greater than mine, but an in-tune resonant low register is just as important to me as the top end. I seem to play in the low register more frequently than I do notes above D above the staff. What worked for me was simply matching trumpet and mouthpiece. Mouthpieces in the Bach 3C size range seem to do it for me, obviously your solution would seem to be different since you are already on a Bach 3C. I also found my best articulation as I worked through this process. Good luck.
    Jim
     
  5. xjb0906

    xjb0906 Piano User

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    Ed , I am aware of the tuner being pitched one tone higher than my instrument. That is not the issue. When I play notes below the staff they are below pitch and not as resonant as the higher notes. I am looking for advice on how technique changes the pitch on notes below the staff.
     
  6. vern

    vern Piano User

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    xjb0906,

    I am not a teacher or a professional but have observed that this is a common problem. My teacher (many years ago!) recommended special attention to exercises below the staff in Clarke book studies 1-4 and to not forget to SUPPORT these notes. I can only imagine he meant maintaining a firm (outer) embouchure and "blowing" the note in-tune. Good luck and, until you get a teacher, I hope this helps.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    It is often the case that we relax too much for the lower tones both with air and embouchure. I would suggest practicing at different dynamics, to be able to bark out the low tones or play them very softly. Using the trombone sound as a model can help as well.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    XJB - the sound below Low C needs lots of air. I've found that not much embouchure change is needed at all - but you really have to have volumes of air. I also found starting on the low G and doing intervals (G to A, G to B, etc.) Up and down the staff will help tremendously - be sure to come back to the low G each time - you should be able to work a 2 octave range ending on the G on top of the staff and still hit the Low G (I believe intervals and being aware of AIR) will help you a great deal (give it a few minutes each day for a couple of weeks before you conclude whether this helps or not. Also do chromatic scales down from middle C and keeping the same volume down to the low G/F#
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Of course long tones below the staff also holding on the in tune notes
     
  10. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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