NPS - No Pressing System

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by joaorocha, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

    129
    2
    Nov 25, 2008
    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    I just splurged on something similar from Osmun - their "pressure adapter, trumpet", which is really a "Methodischer Uebungsadapter" from MIGMA eG. It's simpler, going between the mouthpiece and the trumpet, and because it changes the length of the tube it changes the tone. This one looks like it'll have less effect on the tone.

    However, it is a completely amazing (if pricey) way to reveal just how much I rely on pressure to play. Getting instant feedback on that, instead of waiting to see how much my lips complain later, makes it much easier to change my ways. It's also adjustable, which makes it a bit easier to get started.

    Wish I'd had one of these years - well, decades - ago.

    Update: Actually, maybe it's a little different from the Osmun thing, now that I got one of those pages in English - http://bit.ly/ef8qP8 .
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2011
  2. joaorocha

    joaorocha New Friend

    21
    0
    Mar 29, 2010
    yes, i think i will buy one of those, for when i study clark and bai-lin etc., i will use this, and this way i think i will get better results in endurance because i think i get tired so quick and maybe is because of too much pressure in the mouthpiece.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    NPS=BJS. Big Joke System

    There are (a few?) players that function with very low pressure. This is not normal and I will state that many players have quit trumpet because of the frustration involved in attempting to do this. I know of many more in this category than have benefitted by it.

    Successful playing is an evolutionary process for almost all of us. We can all reduce pressure by learning to breath better, improving our body use and developing a better daily routine. That means working on US not looking for PLACEBOS.
     
  4. ewanmains

    ewanmains Piano User

    285
    50
    Jun 9, 2009
    Kilmarnock, UK
    Most of the players I know (including myself) somehow know when we're using too much pressure. We all seem to have these built in human sensors called "pain" and "ears".

    Just remember - the pinkie hook is not an octave key.

    10 out if 10 for trying though!

    :-)

    (P.S. it seems to make his trumpet quite out of tune as well).
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,417
    7,543
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    Kudos to Rowuk and ewanmains ( although I "disagree" about the octave key ;-)). I have a proven system for NO PRESSURE and it will not hurt your lips! Don't practice! :lol::lol: Actually, if you get a "cookie cutter" mpc from the early 20th century, that's a good way to lower the pressure. They hurt!
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2011
  6. simonstl

    simonstl Pianissimo User

    129
    2
    Nov 25, 2008
    Dryden/Ithaca, NY
    I'm not really surprised by Rowuk's response - anything that might come between a student and a proper teacher clearly doesn't make him happy, ever.

    However, I'd also suggest that a large part of the teacher-student relationship is feedback, not just "does it sound good" or "how high can I play", but "am I using the right muscles?" and "how much pressure is appropriate?"

    If devices can provide some of that feedback, especially if they're in a context of a broader teacher-student conversation, I think they can be more than a placebo.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,616
    7,962
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Simon,
    we actually do not disagree. Even without a teacher, one can improve. On the other hand, just like all of the quick diet promises out there only work for a small percentage of the population, this particular "solution" is not different.

    The best results are simply by diligently practicing things that are good for you for the longest time possible. This is where a teacher can speed up that process - or for some make it possible at all.

    I will maintain that range and endurance are NOT a function of a particular technique. They are also not directly related to muscle tone. They are the synergy of all of the factors wind, body and mind - the biggest being the concept of how those notes should sound (mind).

    Unfortunately, there is a bit of truth in almost all solutions. The part of those solutions that is untrue is often not obvious to the uninitiated. I believe that is why many members come here. To get opinions that have a bit more than just hearsay value. That is only possible through experience.
     
  8. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,417
    7,543
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia

    After actually listening carefully, I do not believe he played higher than a G below high C. And most everything else was below middle C. Just practice and save your money for a good horn. WHAT A GIMMICK!
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,129
    9,305
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Yes, I agree - this demonstration proves nothing over the standard natural horn. I really was unimpressed with the tone quality of the sound out of the horn.
     

Share This Page