NPS - No Pressing System

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by joaorocha, Apr 1, 2011.

  1. Dave Mickley

    Dave Mickley Forte User

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    about twenty yrs ago I knew a trumpet teacher that advocated the no pressure approach to trumpet playing. he said you should be able to lay your trumpet on the top of a piano and play up to a high C with out touching the trumpet with anything but your lips. he stated that he could suspend his trumpet with a cord and play way past high C with out using his hands and if I took lessons from him I would be able to do this also. this may work for some but I think a "good" teacher knows how to work with each student and help him/her to play in the way it works best for that person.
     
  2. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    There has to be SOME pressure to play ....... ALWAYS looking to reduce pressure is a good way to go right past the optimum spot.:cool:

    Turtle
     
  3. craigph

    craigph Piano User

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    I've read this kind of thing before: so-and-so was once seen to play a high something-or-other while the trumpet sat on a table / hung from a string / floated in mid-air. Has ANYONE ever witnessed this apocryphal feat first hand? I find such stories difficult to believe.

    I think a lot of us can use less pressure to play, but there has to be some pressure in order to make a seal on the lips.
     
  4. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Ah, the trumpet on a string concept -- my brass band conductor (himself a military trumpeter) described this as an aspirational goal many years ago. I would have tried it then except I didn't have any handy hooks in the ceiling.

    --bumblebee
     
  5. treble_forte

    treble_forte Pianissimo User

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  6. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    There was pressure, from the horn pushing into his lips from being slanted downward slightly (bell up). All this seems too gimmicky. Too much pressure, sure seems bad for obvious reasons. But NO pressure??
     
  7. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I think might be making too many assumptions here.

    No one in this thread said they were looking for a quick fix.

    No one in this thread said you should play with no pressure.

    Ditto. I don't use the device, so I can't comment on it. But in principle, I agree that the issue isn't the device, it's how the device is used.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2011
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I have tried these things, the pitch of the horn changes, the focus of each note and the intonation and blow. My take is that a Gizmo will not help the player not getting good personal advice, and when involved with a good teacher, they can improve also without a Gizmo. If the player is really good, then they can get away with just about anything - and reap benefits from things not really suitable for weaker players.

    My question is, what does a weak player twist out of shape to get a Gizmo to work? If support is the issue, then what does the Gizmo do to help by limiting possible pressure - nothing except frustrate the player with those weak chops.

    Conventional hard work where the investment is physical instead of monetary is still the best medicine for all wind players ails!
     
  9. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Good post Rowuk. I still believe that there may be a place for these ancillary endeavors (although I don't use any of them myself). That was the reason for my last post. However, I definitely agree with you that the best way to become a better trumpet player is to practice on the trumpet.
     
  10. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Check out the Chris Botti interview in the current thread .... Botti agrees with this sentiment in a big way and has basically built a career around it, simplifying everything to the max, so that it's only about the hard work.

    Well put, Rowuk. I'm printing it out and tacking it on my board. If I actually lived by it, I could save a lot of money. :lol:

    Turtle
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2011

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