Odd buzzing from side of lips

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by man, Dec 23, 2014.

  1. man

    man New Friend

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    Oct 11, 2014
    Recently when I have been playing notes A to C (above the staff) the left side of my lips have been buzzing. I play off center, and have only recently been able to play in this range. Does anyone have any advice on how to fix this?
     
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Sometimes I see these posts from new users and I wonder if we're being shined on by someone.

    Without seeing you play or knowing anything about your background as player - age, years behind the horn, relative ability level - it's really hard to say what's going on. From what you've described you've got air escaping from side, but there are a number of different reasons that might occur.

    One thing I can say with certainty though is proper posture/body use, proper breathing, and regimen of easy, soft long tones in the low register go a long, long way toward correcting some of the common chops issues that crop up with young or inexperienced players IF they take the time to sit down and do them properly.

    There's no magic tidbit or trick to playing the trumpet - most good players get there with a lot of time and work in the practice room working the raw fundamentals of the technique they use to make music.
     
  3. man

    man New Friend

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    Oct 11, 2014
    Sorry to seem like I'm "shining" you, I've been playing for 3 years and just noticed the problem recently, thank you for your advicd.
     
  4. man

    man New Friend

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    Oct 11, 2014
    *advice
     
  5. Hornlife98

    Hornlife98 Pianissimo User

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    You could post a video of it occurring.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Even without seeing anything, leakage can only occur when the pressurized air in the mouth can escape. Can be two things: too much air pressure or too weak chops. Generally both things are related. We use pressure by mashing the horn into the lips when the "right" things aren't sufficiently trained. We use pressure because it works (at least for a while). The problem is when we compensate for clamped off chops with blowing harder, something has to give. Many players experience this for the first time when playing in marching band.

    The solution is called intelligent daily practice to create an environment where the air pressure is not excessive to compensate. What any particular player has to do varies a bit, but it starts with proper breathing and body use as well as "enough" proper practice time containing long tones and lipslurs. I have MANY posts on this. Google Circle Of Breath.
     
  7. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Get yourself a teacher. Now.
     
  8. man

    man New Friend

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    Oct 11, 2014
    Thank you for your wisdom rowuk, and I have a teacher, but right now I'm not in a position to speak with my teacher, as it's the holidays.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    What you have does not occur over night. Many things come together to make weaknesses more apparent. My hunch is medium to poor body use, excessive chop pressure and insufficient breathing. To fix that, significant things must happen and optimally they will be monitored.

    The leaking air is probably in what you consider to be your upper register, so just play less there, or at least a lot softer.

     
  10. man

    man New Friend

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    Oct 11, 2014
    I'd love to play there less often, but my music calls for me to play in that range decently often. I'll have to try to play softer which is rather hard.
     

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