Odd Selmer Melody Maker

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by Cornetist, Jun 16, 2012.

  1. Dupac

    Dupac Fortissimo User

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    It's a cornet Selmer "Melody Maker" (Selmer in England, not in France), like this one :

    [​IMG]
    (Thanks to the excellent site "Horn-U-Copia").

    Postscript : According to the description you made, the mouthpiece looks like a genuine Selmer cornet one.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2012
  2. Cornetist

    Cornetist New Friend

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    I actually have two Melody Makers. My first looks like the photo submitted by Dupac. (Thanks, Dupac, for that photo.)

    Differences between the two horns include 1) the silver one requires a mpc more like a traditional cornet mpc. The mpcs from the brass one are way too large, 2) the silver one has an additional tuning slide before entry into the third valve. This allows the horn to be tuned for Bb and for A, but the brass one is only a Bb, 3) the silver one has a serial number on second valve casing, the brass one has no serial number anywhere. The spit valves are different. The bell of the silver one is smaller in diameter. The bracing and the valve caps and bottoms on the silver one suggest a much older model. But why would the brass one be designed to use a mpc the size of a flugelhorn mpc? It seems very odd to me.

    Any additional information about either model, such as possible age, mpc info, etc. would be really appreciated. I really like the sound on the brass one better than that of the silver one. The brass one is rounder and darker -- more flugel-like. I assume much of that comes from the mpcs.
     
  3. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Valve caps and finger pads are typically Selmer, France; similarly the odd main waterkey. The bending of the pipes as well as slide shape and positioning remind me of 1960s vintage Boosey & Hawkes student and intermediate cornets - which were then made in Czechoslovakia. The adjustable ring for slide 3 again is very un-Selmer; and the mpc receiver clearly was added or changed later, possibly for someone in Central or Eastern Europe where cornet shank mouthpieces were rare and almost impossible to find until very recently. As to the case: My Courtois 154R Flugelhorn (bought in 1998) has a similar case.
     
  4. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    The main brace on Dupac's silver horn-photo resembles that of 1950s-80s Amati angled telescopic braces. However, the forward-facing 2nd valves slide and the position of the 1st valve ports are not in the usual places for Amatis of the era.
     
  5. MFfan

    MFfan Fortissimo User

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  6. Dupac

    Dupac Fortissimo User

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    Look at this "Super DeLuxe" cornet, by Huttl (found in Horn-u-Copia, search "Huttl Instruments") :

    [​IMG]
     
  7. KRax!

    KRax! Pianissimo User

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  8. theo van kampen

    theo van kampen Pianissimo User

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    Has this instrument bottom spring valves? My 'Melody Maker' has.
    Unfortunately I stored her at my Swiss familys house so I cannot send a picture, I use her as study instrument when I am on vacation over there.
    Well build, no red rot, great compression on the very simple build valves. Good player, not excellent though.
    Mine has no brace near tuning slide.
    Mine shares the Conn fingerhook and Olds spit valve.
     
  9. KRax!

    KRax! Pianissimo User

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    Yes, and I agree about the playing opinion.
     
  10. Cornetist

    Cornetist New Friend

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    Dec 4, 2011
    Interesting additional datum . . . . My Melody Maker cornets do not have the bottom valve springs, unlike the Melody Maker trumpets owned by KRax and Theo Van Kampen.

    Also the main spit valve is a slightly different shape than the one in KRax's photo, as is the finger ring.

    Thanks for the replies everyone. Finding out more information is a huge part of the fun of collecting older horns.
     

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