Of all the trumpet players in the USA

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by trumpettrax, Sep 1, 2010.

  1. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Thats why my dad told me to go get a job.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    For the graphic artist beginner, those who purchase Winsor & Newton "Winton" more often come back to purchase the finer products. This compares to a student instrument vis one who really pursues music will upgrade their instrument. Winsor & Newton have a well founded reputation among artists worldwide. I personally use their finest water color brushes, "Albata" Series 7 and no other manufacturer I know has that sap green color. President Eisenhower bought a lot of W&N products, most which he gave away, Major General James Stewart (yes, the actor) bought an oil painting W&N Easel, and several W&N brushes and paints for his wife Gloria's Christmas present. Henry Fonda would order W&N oil paints by the box. Indeed one artist knows what products another uses, just as horn blowers know the other's instruments.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    In my town, a "busker" would be shut down by police vis "disturbing the peace". It would simply be a "shut it down and pack it up" unless the "busker" made violent objections while disobeying a police command. Then, the Judge may accomodate them for anywhere from 30 days to 11/29 (11 months and 29 days). The chief didn't know all the details as it happened before he was appointed, but he tells me it was quite serious when the "busker" tried to bash the officer's head with a violin case and as the officer blocked the hit the "busker's" violin went on to smash a grocery store window. 3 years (felony assault on an oofficer) plus restitution (cost of window).
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    And that's why I found a way to earn a living in the Army playing trumpet. It seemed like a pretty good compromise.

    In some ways I regret going to the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps. My thought was that it was more rank, (base rank of SSG/E6 - special bandsman) more money, stability and good hours - some joked that it was the best part-time job in the Army. It was all of those things. On the other hand, I left the regular Army Band program where I was playing good music in a lot of different ensembles, such as a big band, brass quintet and concert band, and my bread and butter was made playing bugle calls with a one-valved bugle. If I didn't play on the side, there just wasn't much "real" music to be had. 5 years into it I finally started gigging in a Latin Band, and that was the beginning of a comeback as a player.

    As I see it, I've had a great deal of success playing on the side and doing a regular 9-5, professional level "day job." The day job pays the bills, but the side gigs are a lot of fun, and I have done recording projects and gigged doing a lot of different things. There are times when it feels like I don't have enough time to devote to being a player, but more and more I see it as a situation where I have the time if I manage it properly and make the time in my day to work on my chops and my craft with the horn.

    It's what you make of it and it's also your definition of the word "success." At this point, I'm not sure I'd have it any other way with maybe the exception of playing in a premier military group again - that's about as good as it gets where you get paid fairly well and you never have to worry about whether or not you are going to get paid.
     
  5. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    ok, let me add to this. how much of the success is due to player ability versus equipment. How much of an impact does equipment have. Is a professional level horn a professional level horn no matter who plays it? i.e. Monette vs. Bach. I really don't think this should matter - that much.

    Trax
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    I think it's all player abilty. Too much is made of equipment being the cure for lack of talent and/or unwillingness to practice. I've played a Monette. It's great. Did it make me as good as "insert favorite players name"? No! Can "insert favorite players name" tear it up on an Ambassador? Yes! I think when you talk about a professional level horn, it can be so subjective and much is as much marketing by the manufacturer. I own several vintage pro horns that by today's standards aren't. Do they sound like crap now? No. I agree that it doesn't matter much.
     
  7. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

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    Ed Lee you make a good point about art materials - the low priced stuff is an entry into better stuff later. I just think it's funny that it's called Winton ... Wynton, .. lol.

    I think you town has been described often enough, and at length, to guarantee that no one reading your screeds will try to busk there. Lous Armstrong (and many others) got his start busking, and that's good enough for me. Louis I'm sure would never go near your town and that's also good enough for me.

    TrickG I think joining one of the military bands is the best way to go, by far. You get paid to play at a high level, and the military's the last square deal for the non-wealthy kids left.

    Good points on pro horns and busking etc. I'd not want to take a pro horn out busking. I tend to think in terms of fairly cheap, fairly replaceable, durable, etc. So much of it is the player, that in the busking environment it won't worry.

    Busking isn't just being able to play, it's also being able to relate to people, P.R. skills. Again, to me, well, Louis Armstrong is my hero. Incredible skill, which he always kept up and kept improving, and knew how to relate to people.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I prefer to NOT make a living on the trumpet. don't get me wrong - I strive to be the best I can possibly be -- but I feel trying to make $, would add stress and pressure -- and then it might be like a job -- instead of fun.
    but I hope to volunteer to play for more venues in the future
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Making money with your horn IS fun! I made money tonight on a wedding band gig and had a blast in the process. It's not always a "job" when money gets involved.
     
  10. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I've used this in another post, but 12 yrs ago I saw Phil Driscoll in concert. He put aside his custom pro horn and mpc, and picked up a beat up old student model with a 7c ---- and it sounded absolutely beautiful.

    the custom model was easier/funner to play --but you get good sound out of any horn/mpc-- like Phil said -- it really amounts to 1,000's of hours of practice.
     

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