Off the horn 3 days....

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by schleiman, May 25, 2011.

  1. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    there is a great learning lesson here --- FRUSTRATION and MENTAL confidence will have a lot to do with your playing. when either slips that affects -WHAT WE THINK IS WRONG WITH OUR CHOPS!!!!!!!!
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    This happens all the time to me as well. Well at least it use to. I don't let it happen anymore as I play regularly in a band and I would be devistated coming back after 3 days off to try to keep up with the band's demanding song list. So I will try to play everyday and when this is not possible, I will play on my mouthpiece into a towel while driving in my care for 30-45 minutes.

    As you are noticing, it'll come back to you within about 3-5 days if you start back slow and then gradually build. I notice that just after about a week, I myself can return to my baseline.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Events like this simply remind us that we are human. While I don't buy the "I can't miss a day" state, we are all different and if we learned that 3 days is a bummer, that sets up our priorities for the future.

    Our audiences could care less what physical or psychlogical dependencies that we have!

    Perhaps some perspective out of my own life: If I have a gig coming up, then only MY funeral will slow me down. My frame of mind is to dedicate my playing to the honor of that person. If I don't have a gig coming up, then only the practice room suffers. I can deal with that.

    My experience is that when you have paid your dues, you can ALWAYS get through. When you have to pull that card, NO ONE really wants to hear about it. Players that come to a gig and start with an excuse like "I couldn't practice", don't get asked back. They are a liability.
     
  4. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    Nicely put Robin.

    I think that a lot of musicians take a similar approach to that - I'm that way to a point and sometimes I get grief by the missus about my committment to the instruments I play and the music I'm playing because of the amount of time it takes, but that's really what it boils down to - if you want to sound good, you have to put in the time doing structured practice. So many hobbyists just don't get it. They think if they practice for 30 minutes to an hour here or there and are only playing what they like to play, that they should be good, and they don't understand why they are so limited it what they can do in an ensemble. (this attitude seems to be more prevalent in electric/amplified bands rather than wind ensembles, thankfully)

    One of the things that I find frustrating about the praise bands I've played in is the lack of committment to preparing for the upcoming Sunday, and I hear the same kinds of excuses - "Oh, I just didn't have time to practice this week," or even worse, "I'm just not feeling this song." The latter is one I've heard from a guitar player when he doesn't like or doesn't want to play a certain song - it's his way of throwing a wrench into it with the idea that we'll toss the song and maybe won't play it. Both excuses just irriate me. If you are going to do it, then DO IT. MAKE the time to practice (I understand things like a death in the family or other extenuating one-off things, but otherwise find the time.) and find ways to at least appreciate even the songs you don't like. That was one of the biggest irritations with my son for when I tried to get him involved. He excused his lack of learning the material on the fact that it wasn't interesting to him. To me, that's beside the point - when you agree to a gig, you need to prepare for it - period.

    Ok. /rant
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2011
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Unless it was a close or immediate family member, I would take my horn with me and sneak practice time. I had to go to a wedding this past weekend and snuck my horn in the van (I packed). When no one was in the room, out came the horn. Did they miss me? No, it was about them, not me. I was there for the good stuff though. I even managed to get a copy of a hymnal for sight reading ( I offered to buy it, but the gentleman just blessed me with it)! Glad to hear you're getting your chops back.

    And Patrick, I feel your pain regarding praise bands. Most of our guitar solos have to be covered by another instrument cause the new guys won't learn them. What's really bad is when the singer forgets the words to a song we've been doing for years!:bash::bash::cry::cry:
     
  6. leftmid7

    leftmid7 Mezzo Piano User

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    The old adage(attributed to Doc, but it's been around):

    'If I miss a day, I notice;
    2 days, the band notices;
    3 days, the audience notices.'

    is an adage for a reason. If I miss a day, I notice.
     
  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    That's been around, and there are variations (2 days, the critics notice) - I wonder who originated it because I've heard it attributed to a lot of different people ranging from Artur Rubenstein to Vladimir Horowicz to Ignacy Jan Paderewski. (Mostly concert pianists) But regardless of who originally said it, there is a lot of truth to it.
     
  8. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    Yes, I'm still at the very beginning of my journey, so knocks like this are necessary to learn exactly what happens if I don't practice.
     
  9. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    Ah, but I need to clear up a few things I am NOT an accomplished player. I'm still developing my facial muscles, I've been at it just about a year. And when I say 2-3 hours a day, that is with 15 minute rests every 15 minutes. The practice session is spaced out over 4-5 hours. I've learned how much my chops can take and I rest long before they are burned out. I can understand your skepticism though. :)
     
  10. schleiman

    schleiman Piano User

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    Austin, TX
    Agreed. I get better by playing what is difficult or hard for me. Those are the areas I focus on. Interestingly enough, trying to play what you can't, makes playing what you can easier. :) Also thank you to everyone who posted, the purpose of this post was not to sound whiny or to complain, but simply to foster discussion.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2011

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