Off the horn 3 days....

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by schleiman, May 25, 2011.

  1. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I'm not surprised.

    :-)
     
  2. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh well, I guess this will REALLY put some people in a tizzy!

    I don't understand why people forget how to play the trumpet after one or two or (gasp) three days off.

    You're doing something wrong.

    I do not always have the chance, OR the inclination to practice everyday.

    Maybe I am different from everyone out there, but maybe I'm not.

    I play lead trumpet (for 11 years now) in the busiest swing/big band in Detroit. It is not a modern big band, we play mostly the original charts of the Dorsey's, Harry James, Jimmy Lunceford, Goodman, and Shaw bands. Also a lot of Basie/Sinatra charts. That means there are (gasp again) NO double Cs. I don't have one anyway. Not what I call a double C.

    There are many times when after the rehearsal on every Wednesday, that I don't touch the horn again until the gig on Saturday. How does it feel? Like it always has....just the way it should. I have NO problem playing with three or four days, or even a week off... if that happens. When we go on a week long vacation, I usually leave the horn home, unless I have a gig where we are playing. I can come back home on a Saturday and play a gig that night, and NO ONE will know I haven't played in a week.

    I think it is all in the head of the person.

    In my opinion, if a day or two off kills you, you need to do something different.
     
  3. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    Hear-Hear!! I've actually found that a couple days off here and there improves my tone. Go figure.
     
  4. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    +1
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    People don't foget how to play the trumpet. Their lips loose this memory. If you do not require an accelerated demand level, perhaps you may not notice the time away from practicing. But if your playing is demanding maximal effort, the missing of a couple of days will be felt and noticed, again, first by the performer, and later by others.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2011
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    yes it does for me also (OK -1 day off and a light practice day or two)) -- when I am pushing the limits of my capabilities in the previous days. I haven't take 2 or more days off since my comeback 2 1/2 years ago, so I haven't forgotten how to play.
    WAIT a minute -- before my comeback - I took 7 years off -- and on the comeback I could still manage a C scale --- so my lips didnt' forget for over 7 years.
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    That normally means that your tone (or analytic capabilities) had room for improvement before you took time off. Less is seldom seriously more.
     
  8. shooter

    shooter Piano User

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    No doubt. I would submit that even Wynton thinks he has room for improvement. That is why we practice the things we love, ever upping the ante on ourselves. If my body and mind were capable, I could practice 24 hours a day nonstop and continuously improve. I have found, however, that taking a day-two-or three off every now and then.....resets my focus.....so to speak. I come back with renewed energy and vigor and everything just feels good. I'm the same way with golf. If I haven't played in awhile, I get worried that I'm gonna stink it up, but I always surprise myself because my body just seems more relaxed and in tune and I play rather well. Must just be me. Please don't take days off of playing because it works for me. Everyone is different.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2011
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Maybe the key is not the days off, rather a program that is consistent with better playing, keeping the creative focus and the like. The "rut" that some of us get into is not based on time, rather how we fill that time.

    On the other hand, if you just don't have the time, then there is no need to "justify" that with the misconception that we play better because of that. We just do what we have to do.

    Trumpet playing is physical work and muscle memory. There is no "benefit" in 3 days off (other than less collisions with other activities). Sometimes we have no choice.
     
  10. duanemassey

    duanemassey Piano User

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    I suspect it depends upon a lot of things. I know my endurance suffers greatly when I don't play regularly, but neither my range or tone is affected very much. I typically practice very rarely, as the playing I do is not particularly demanding (and my time is used up trying to make a living and some semblance of a life). Most of my gigs (including my steady house band) involve my keyboard playing for the most part. I am a poor example of what a full-time player should aspire to be, but one size does not fit all.
    It is no coincidence that every full-time player I know has a regular practice routine.
     

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