Oil the valve springs?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by dangeorges, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    It seems that this attitude would rather square well with this:
    I don't see any less reason to question what Local says than to question what he considers to be conventional wisdom.
     
  2. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Yes. But I'm not sure we should use salt on them either. :-)

    Mike
     
  3. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Since this is not truth but rather a delusion....

    I have a horn right next to me, a Buescher Lightweight 400 Model 217. It leaked so bad it wasn't playable. After the valves were refit, it's a stellar player.

    So, no, it's ridiculous to take sandpaper to your valves. But, it's your horn, you ruin it however you like.

    Tom
     
  4. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Local, buddy, this is not the way to go. It was a simple comment meant in the best nature. Also, when did Chuck get involved in this???? I didnt see a comment from him here.
    Follow? For the most part, this was a huge post and half of it had nothing to do with this topic.

    Of course the horn will leak, every horn will as you said. But I believe the goal is too not make it worse.

    Local, please watch yourself. Your a good guy and dont give anyone a reason to ban you please.
     
  5. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Whether it's oil or slide grease, applying some rust preventative to the springs will prevent them from corroding. The same goes for water key springs and trigger springs, and even a miniscule amount of grease on the contact points of these springs will delay wear to them and the components they touch.

    I cringed when I read about using sandpaper on valves. It doesn't matter if you use 600 grit or 2000 grit, you're removing material from the valves and increasing the clearance between them and the casings. If you like the uniform look of the valves when you're done, you misunderstand the purpose of the valves; they are supposed to seal, not look shiny. You can question convention all you want, but you cannot defy the laws of physics.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2012
  6. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I'm not sure it's right. But in the interest of corrosion-prevention, I also apply a couple drops on each spring when I oil the valves. I also put a few drops of oil down the leadpipe for the same reason.

    Mike
     
  7. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Mike,
    I always wondered this. How much do you put down it and do you rotate the horn or anything? I thought about it but didnt know if there is a special way or not. How often do you do that?
     
  8. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Hi Cody,

    I usually put 5-10 drops down the leadpipe after I swab the leadpipe. Then I blow it into the horn.

    I used to do this every day. Now I do it maybe twice a week.

    Mike
     
  9. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Wow, that often? What does this do? So let me see if I am getting this right, you put in in the leadpipe receiver and blow to get an even coating in the leadpipe then you let any excess out the water key? Thanks.
     
  10. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    Once a month I do a complete clean in soapy water. I dont't soak the valves but I inspect the springs. So far I have seen no reason to put oil on the springs. Some oil always seem to make its way to the bottom of the springs anyway. I brush the inside of the leadpipe with sopay water, dry it, then apply a moderate amount of isopropyl alcohol, and dry it again. Outside of the thorough clean, I apply a few drops of oil in the leadpipe once in a while (couple of times a week). Some clerk once mistakenly sold me some rotary valve oil that is now reserved to that purpose. I do rotate the horm as I do so but more because it's kinda fun than for any demonstrated effectiveness...
     

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