Oil the valve springs?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by dangeorges, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

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    As I gathered, it helps prevent the growth of some bacteria that use Zinc and can cause red rot.
     
  2. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I figure it's easier to keep the horn clean if you get the "pizza" at the source (the leadpipe).

    Yes, I blow the oil into the horn. Then for a couple minutes of playing, I deliberately do NOT let out the excess from the water key.

    Mike
     
  3. codyb226

    codyb226 Banned

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    Okay, Thanks Mike and Phil. I will try it I guess.
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Rowuk does not consider local to be a slayer of anything except his own opportunities. He recently posted that his axe is in miserable shape. Hmmmm.

    A properly cared for horn does not need the valves sanded or lapped yearly. Regular brushing of our teeth keeps the nasties out of the horn.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    There is a big misconception about how "tight" valves should be. Based on our blowing pressure, it should make no difference. The misunderstanding is that the leakage is from the standing wave which is an AC component. The pressure nodes are so strong that the horn vibrations are easily felt.

    Tightness makes the horn play better. It is very easy to try. Use a thicker oil like Hetman Classic. The horn is often considerably better.

    I address many posts because of the marginal content. Local just happens to start many such posts. Sandpaper is dangerous and dumb.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2012
  6. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    On a scale of one to ten, with one being NEVER cleaning it, I think you'd be in the 9.9 department for cleaning your horn once a month. That's my opinion, it's more than you need to, but you'll never see if it's true or not because you're not doing any harm to it. I have a buddy who NEVER cleans his horn in my section, and one who does, quite often, with me in the middle somewhere, like a 4 or 5. we all have no problems. You can change the oil in your car every week, and not have one issue, or you can change it every 4,000 miles and still have good results. All this is just my opinion, and not solid carved in granite information. But I have been around a good while and these are my observations.
     
  7. J. Jericho

    J. Jericho Fortissimo User

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    Don't forget the floss. In addition to keeping your horn in better shape, this combination has the side effect of drastically reducing your dental expenses.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2012
  8. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Years ago I sent a horn to Osmun Brass to have the valve compression checked. It was unplayable. Completely out of tune with itself. this was a horn I had played for many years, but a repair tech had ruined it. Osmun told me the valves were at about 85% compression. I had them rebuilt and WOW> I had my horn back playing better than ever. That's with just a cnge from 85% to 95% compression. I've spent a lot of years playing/testing many horns. Excessive wear in the valves will affect how a horn plays. In degrees of stuffiness, no center, hard to blow and out of tune with itself.
     
  9. tedh1951

    tedh1951 Utimate User

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    Let me add a slightly different perspective to this .... we, in the aviation community, understand that mixing water and aviation fuel (not unlike trumpet oil) are two substances that can cause corrosion in aviation metal strucures (fuel tanks). Well, it's not actually the water OR the oil, it's the microbiological Ju-Jubes that live in the water and feed from the fuel (oil). These little beasties then release a corrosive waste product that in turn chomps away at the structure. In aircraft, we dose the tanks with a nasty poison called Biobor, but it only works if there is water in the fuel.

    Think about your trumpet now - expired air containing moisture, and oil - presumably an interface between the two where greeblies might live (and crap acidic by-products onto the metal). I don't want to increase the surface area available to be attacked by any by-products that may or may not get into my horn (by sanding). If I drain the moisture from the trumpet, I can minimise some of the potential drama. If I regularly oil, I can minimise potential drama. If I regularly clean the trumpet, and inspect it for damage, I monitor the potential for damage to my trumpet and am able to fix it before Trumpet Death occurs.

    Would I ever use sand-paper - NUP NEVER.

    I resist any tempation to apply ANY abrasive - but using my training I have occasionally used toothpaste on trumpet valves - for a maximum of 50 cycles of the valve and then a thorough clean, a relube - and happy playing thereafter.

    If you consider sandpaper - please consider this equally unlikely set of thought patterns of mine.

    There are other viewpoints, in this case mine are based on training and 42 years of maintenance experience on soft metals.

    But it's your choice, they are your valves, and it's your money.
     
  10. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Thanks Ted. Very interesting information. (Now there's one more thing to make me not want to fly.) Maybe someone can confirm. But I thought that some toothpastes have an abrasive effect.

    And to build on what you said, the little buggers living in your trumpet are more likely to be oral flora, that are having a lot of fun living off the "pizza" in your trumpet.

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2012

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