Old Lou Tribute week 1/11/2015 - 1/18/2015

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Osren, Jan 11, 2015.

  1. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Jul 5, 2010
    Vienna, Austria, Europe
    Well, I only knew Old Lou from TM as the old sage that he was. I respected him as such, and as the wily and sly coon in the corner. A man of parts, with wisdom and, I gather, an immense love for all those near to him. We are all diminished by his passing; but Heaven has gained by his presence. Enjoy eternity, OldLou! And tell the Angels all they need to know about York Horns!
     
  2. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Great Southern Land
    I believe he was 77 years old when he passed away last year.

    --bumblebee
     
  3. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    Nov 4, 2007
    Canada

    :huh: Strange, that's exactly how old my Vocabell is.
     
  4. ConnDirectorFan

    ConnDirectorFan Fortissimo User

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    Nov 5, 2010
    United States
    Another coincidence - there were student York horns with "AUSTRIA" stamped on the second valve case right-hand-side - Amati-made stencils, but probably purchased through Musica Steyr, Austria...and the Connection of Amati, Musica, Conn, York...hmm... :think:
     
  5. Silversorcerer

    Silversorcerer Forte User

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    Jun 9, 2010
    Atlanta
    I'll go first with something very critical I learned from Old Lou, a question that only he was able to answer and thus resolve a problem I had with a mouthpiece that constantly was getting stuck, not on a York trumpet, but rather on a 1928 Conn 22B. When I received the horn, the mouthpiece was hopelessly stuck. A previous owner had twisted the lead pipe off of the horn attempting to separate the MP. I had re-soldered the lead pipe and braces, and had Charles King (local professional repairman) get the MP off. Relieved that the MP was unstuck and the horn was playable, I commenced to enjoy it until I was finally spent and went to bed. When I woke up and approached the horn the next day, the MP was again hopelessly stuck. No amount of effort would remove it, so I took it back to Charles King, who was a little frustrated that I had somehow "caused" the problem again so quickly. So I again had everything ship-shape and yet again after a few hours rehearsing, the MP was again, stuck. So I came to the forum for answers as to how and why this was happening.

    It seems that the problem was that the fit was indeed "too perfect". At that time in the 1920s (and only Old Lou still remembered this) some original mouthpieces on various maker's horns were custom fitted to the receiver in such a way that contact between the inserted MP and the interior of the receiver was close to 100%. I forget the exact term for this type of fit, but in addition to guaranteeing the least loss of vibration and power, this type of fit also guaranteed that the MP would get stuck quite easily, just from normal playing pressure. Old Lou suggested that I use a candle to create a stream of fine lampblack soot and hold the shank of the MP over the candle until it was coated all around with the fine soot, then insert the MP into the receiver snuggly and remove it. The disturbance of the soot would show me the amount of surface area that made positive contact. Indeed it was in contact everywhere except for the very front edge of the shank, about .5mm. The rest of the shank showed smeared soot, indicating complete contact. To prevent continued stuck situations, I now routinely apply pencil graphite to that shank before inserting it, so that there is a dry lubricant that allows easy removal of the MP. Thanks to Old Lou, the 1928 22B, which is probably one of my two most favorite trumpets, has never had a stuck MP since then. Thanks for the solution again, Old Lou. Long live your memory.
     
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  6. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    Nov 4, 2007
    Canada
    Silver!!! Where have you been? Welcome back. Cool story. I've never heard of that. What mp were you using, not a BI-222, I hope?
     
  7. Silversorcerer

    Silversorcerer Forte User

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    Jun 9, 2010
    Atlanta
    Yes, it was the original BI-222 for that horn. The two had been "inseparable" for many years. :D That one is in my albums. It's a favorite and now I also use it with a BI-225.

    On the subject of York & Sons cornets, which I have a nice selection of, I got out my Perfectone cornet today. I have realized (slow to figure this out) that these "LP" designated horns are not really made to A=440, but rather A=435. It's a small difference, but quite evident in front of an electronic tuner. It is easy using the HP slide and the second lead pipe slide to get most of these tuned accurate to 440 also, but the registers are in better tune at the LP set up. I think that might be why we sometimes find that these older horns seem out of tune or do not intonate quite as well up the register;- the slides are not at A=440 when adjusted to the LP positions. If all else fails play in a warmer studio.

    There is currently a movement of musicians pushing A back to 432Hz, which is creating a modern context in which the LP instruments (with a nudge of the slide) have nearly perfect intonation. I will check my other York & Sons LP cornets soon and report on these. I have a Professional model and also one of the key convertible ones as well, all in great playing condition.

    Where have I been? I've been messing around with some woodwinds lately, trying to figure them out also. Conn made some sweet saxes and clarinets across the years. I am still a trumpeter, just trying to broaden the palette of sounds I can lay down in recording tracks and diversify my reading. I remain a horn guy, and always will.

    I will make some nice photos of my Yorks and my Couturier, all of these were acquired based on Old Lou's knowledge and endorsement of these rather unique and rare instruments. There is almost no equal to the beauty of the way the old York&Sons cornets are built;- and the ones I have all have gorgeous vintage cornet tone.
     

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