Olympus.

Discussion in 'Horns' started by ScreaminTrumpet, Apr 22, 2004.

  1. ScreaminTrumpet

    ScreaminTrumpet New Friend

    44
    0
    Feb 25, 2004
    Lubbock, TX
    Hey guys. I finally got around to doing this. I recently got to play an Olympus at TMEA....ok not so "recently". I spent a good amount of time with the Reverend and ended up telling all of my trumpet friends about the horns. One of them actually bought one a couple of weeks later. He's a compulsive buyer...what can I say. He also ordered a flugel.... Hey Michael, after I play on the flugel, I may have to give you a call....that is, if I can talk my wife into it!

    This was a raw, copper model as I remember. Here are my impressions.

    I thought it was a good horn with some very interesting qualities. The valves forward design reminds me some of the Olds Recording models. Pretty cool. The sound was great and I was overall impressed with the fit and finish. I was curious as to what some of the rest of you think. I am wondering what some guys have against the horns....especially since a lot of them haven't had the opportunity to play them I would guess. I don't want to start a fight...just a CIVIL discussion!

    Later!
     
  2. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    I'm confused. Are you reviewing a flugel or an Olympus trumpet?

    In either case, what were you comparing it to and what were its "very interesting qualities", besides the valve-forward design? Were you using a 1C mpc in a .470" bore horn? If so, I suspect there were interface and endurance problems.

    Compare and contrast to your horns, telling us about tone, intonation, responsiveness, valve action, build quality, etc., if you would.

    Dave
     
  3. ScreaminTrumpet

    ScreaminTrumpet New Friend

    44
    0
    Feb 25, 2004
    Lubbock, TX
    Sorry Dave,

    I can see how that would have been a little confusing.

    I was reviewing the Olympus, not the flugel. It was comparing it to my customized strad. I was also using a 1C mouthpiece. I really didn't feel any endurance problems. It had a real nice blow compared to my Strad. Also, there was no black hole feeling as if I might fall in.

    I felt that it played as well in tune as my horn, but the sound differed. Could be the copper bell. The Olympus had a smoother, warmer sound than my strad. I thought the response was better than my horn, at all volume levels. I could make it whisper or scream. It didn't break up on me at high levels either. The valves were probably one of the most noticable differences. The combination of springs and material made the valves on the Olympus extremely fast. Pretty cool.

    The fit and finish of the horn I played was great. It is also as good on my friend's Olympus. The visible seam on the bell is a little wierd but I guess the point isn't to stare at the horn. I do have to say that I did like the copper horn more than the one my friend bought. He bought the brushed silver and I just don't like the sound so much. He sounds great on it, but to each his own. I prefered the copper bell model.

    Hopefully that answered a few of your questions.
     
  4. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

    4,529
    8
    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    Fair answer, Screamin. Have you tried any of the other Kanstul trumpets in the larger bore sizes for "comparison" with the ZO? I'm wondering how significant the carryover of Kanstul characteristics are into the Zeus lineup? We hear a lot of comparisons between Zeus and Bach, Yamaha, etc. but how about the products of the firm that actually BUILD them?
     
  5. Zachary Music

    Zachary Music New Friend

    41
    0
    Nov 10, 2003
    There is no other trumpet just like the Olympus, since I designed it.
    The Olympus at the TMEA was an ARL (Brushed Copper Lacquer) and this demo horn was then sent to a player in California who ordered one right away and then to other dealers who showed it and picked up additional orders. This one trumpet generated quite a few sales.

    The second order of Olympus is just about sold out, with six being shipped today.
    I have also put in a large order including virtually every finish, which should arrive in several weeks.

    News of the Olympus is spreading like wildfire. When more come in, I need to ship several to Germany, Japan, Belgium and maybe several brushed gold to Australia.

    Alex
     
  6. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

    684
    3
    Nov 27, 2003
    Denver
    Good for you.
     
  7. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

    1,140
    2
    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    That reminds me of an amusing story. A customer of mine actually contacted a Kanstul dealer (I won't say which one) and asked about the Olympus and Wild Thing. He kind of asked the question your are asking Ed. How do these horns compare to those in the Kanstul line?

    The return comment was interesting ... "If you want to play a horn that big, you might as well play a Kanstul Coliseum Marching trumpet."

    http://www.kanstul.net/pages/instruments/marching/col103 pgs/col103m.html

    Nothing quite compares to the Olympus directly. It was designed from top to bottom by Alex. As he has said to me "everything was thought out before hand." No doubt it was.

    For example, the Coliseum Kanstul may be a big, open, play loud type of horn for marching, but it doesn't have the refinements such as less bracing, reverse leadpipe, etc.

    I have not played a Kanstul WB model, but a customer I demoed the horn to had played a WB. He just said to me they are two different horns. They are hard to compare -- even if you have played them.

    Also, if you compared a lacquered brass Kanstul to an Olympus, it should be in lacquered brass. The brushed copper gives a different sound too. But even so, such a comparison is difficult and I am not sure what it would tell us.

    M&C
     
  8. Reverend

    Reverend Pianissimo User

    161
    0
    Nov 9, 2003
    Greater Houston area
    screamintrumpet,

    Glad you liked the Olympus! They ARE great horns!

    Your friend should be getting his ZFH 900 RL VERY soon! Remember, I'm warning you now...don't play it, cuz if you do...then you'll have to buy one! :wink:

    (On second thought...play it! Another sale would be wonderful!) :D

    Keep in touch!
     
  9. Zeusfan

    Zeusfan New Friend

    22
    0
    Mar 20, 2004
    I just wanted to say that I had the opportunity to play the Kanstul WB at an All-State band this weekend, and it is a great horn. I like the response, intonation, and the finish was a brushed lacquer. It really played well. My only complaint was that I didn't like the way the valves felt. Felt kind of stiff.

    I noticed that ya'll have been comparing the WB to the Olympus. As mentioned previously, they really can't be compared. They are two totally different horns. You should really compare the WB to a Zeus Guarnerius with the rounded .470 bore slide. These two played very similar. However the Zeus pricing starts at $1075 (with the rounded slide added) and the WB listed at $2500.00. That's a lot more money to pay for a stamp on the bell. Plus I like my valves on the Zeus better, but that is just an opinion.
     
  10. MUSICandCHARACTER

    MUSICandCHARACTER Forte User

    1,140
    2
    Jan 31, 2004
    Newburgh, Indiana
    I'll bet the valves were not broken in yet and like with a lot of demo horns, they probably needed to be cleaned and oiled! Every time I demo a trumpet I clean it out and re-oil the valves so that the next person has a chance to play a clean horn.

    Like at any convention or conferences, eat a hot dog and play a horn. Yuck. Clean the horn -- yea!

    M&C
     

Share This Page