one mouthpiece-many backbores

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by crowmadic, Jan 16, 2007.

  1. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I can't recall the maker of a mouthpiece system where you can interchange the components of one mouthpiece. Does anyone know what I'm talking about, and who the maker is? Does anyone know about the pluses and minuses of such a mouthpiece?
     
  2. Richard Oliver

    Richard Oliver Forte User

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    Crow, many mouthpiece manufacturers will do this for you: Bach, Schilke, Stork, Giardinelli, Warburton, Reeves, Kanstul, Curry, bunches of them.

    All the Best,

    Richard Oliver
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2007
  3. nieuwguyski

    nieuwguyski Forte User

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    The biggest name in two-piece mouthpieces (separate cups and backbores) is Warburton. Kanstul makes two-piece mouthpieces too, and their tops and bottoms are interchangeable with Warburton. Not to say that most of the other mentioned manufacturers don't offer something similar...
     
  4. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    Thanks guys, but I was hoping for some pros and cons about the two-piece system also.
     
  5. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

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    Pros: You can switch around mouthpieces and make all kinds of differant combinations depending on what you want to use for differat kinds of playing.

    Cons: It will temp you to want to switch around mouthpieces and make all kinds of differant cominations depending on what you want to use for differant kinds of playing.
     
  6. Richard Oliver

    Richard Oliver Forte User

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    Con: expense and thinking salvation can be found in the mouthpiece drawer.

    Pro: expense and thinking salvation can be found in the mouthpiece drawer.

    Regards,

    Richard
     
  7. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Yee HAW!
    Pro... it can really help you "dial in" to the perfect piece (and then you sell all the bits off on Ebay and buy "the perfect piece").

    Con... When you trade your horn in for a different one you get to start allllll over again! (impedance and end-gap yano).
     
  8. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 24, 2005
    You might be thinking of the Stomvi mouthpiece that have a seperate rim, cup and shank. You can buy a set with a rim or two, several cups of various depth and trumpet and cornet shank.

    Pro: If you happen to like the same rim on the big trumpet and piccolo trumpet, it's easy to do.

    Con: It's a hassle two change them in and out, they might get stuck, and if they do get stuck, it'll be on a gig when you have to change often from Bb to piccolo!

    Con II: It's expensive.

    Pro II: If you've played on the same sizes for years, don't want to change, and simply want a new version of the same thing with some flexibility, thats what it'll provide.

    Pro III: If you drop you mouthpiece and nick up the rim, you only have to replace the rim, not the whole thing.
     
  9. crowmadic

    crowmadic Mezzo Piano User

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    Oct 3, 2006
    I'll have to visit these burden's of Warburton, i'm in the same state.......thanks for the encouragement fellas......
     
  10. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    I have found that I have settled on the Warburtons for most of my playing (on most instruments). I have got 2 of each top, so that if I am swapping between instruments I don't need to undo the tops and swap them over when changing instrument. With some brass ensemble repertoire requiring instrument changes within a bar or two, having to rebuild mouthpieces at the same time is just impractical.
     

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