One of those days...

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Comeback, Nov 24, 2013.

  1. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Jun 22, 2011
    Fort Wayne, IN
    We had grandchildren staying with us this weekend so practice was haphazard. They've gone home and I'm settling into some serious normal practice. While warming up I found myself playing notes solidly high above my normal upper limit of D above the staff; in fact I didn't even recognize them. Why was that? I am not "all about range". My focus is on pleasing sound and good technique, but still it was fun. It will be interesting to see if reaching those notes is repeatable tomorrow.

    Jim
     
  2. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    Apr 8, 2010
    Massachusetts
    Sometimes when we take a break from the horn, our chops have a chance to heal or refresh, so that when we are able to warm up again, that this brings a newfound strength to our abilities. That said, if you work your way up often enough, then yes, you can hit way above the staff. But, take it slow. As you work your way up, go in octaves, an think "EEE"as you go up the scales i.e. pedal C to low C; low C to middle C; and middle C to high C, etc. I recommend trying to hit the highest note, regardless of what it is, three times, then stop. Rest for at least an hour, then either start again with something else or continue to work on the higher notes. It is critical to rest. Your comments prove that point.

    I use the Claude Gordon book on Practical Practicing. The lessons take you from the lower pedal tones up to double high C. I use these exercises, taking the required rest periods, almost daily. And yes, I can hit a double high C pretty solid, daily, and I am only starting my third year on the Comeback trail.

    Hope this helps,

    Gary
     
  3. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    Aug 7, 2013
    Lagos, Nigeria
    Jim,

    I find these creeping into my 'repertoire' from time to time. I take it as a positive sign that my embouchure is developing in the right direction, and one day I'll be able to take ownership of this register. But in my case, they're not linked to my working range and when I put the tuner on them, their intonation is all over the place - like a clear, in-tune open F#! I've played around with them a little but cautiously, as after a little while they start messing with my tone lower down. So I always revert to my normal range and concentrate on extending that semitone by semitone. Don't want to jeopardise my tone and intonation (such as they are).

    Seth
     
  4. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Jun 22, 2011
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Lots of good comeback advice in your post, Gary. Frankly, we are proceeding more similarly than differently. I have not yet worked pedals into my routine but have experimented with them. Where you use the CG book, I use Arban's. It is interesting to me that you are in your third year back and are experiencing such achievement. I am approaching my third year anniversary. While I have had fun with my comeback since beginning anew, it is becoming more fun now. Thank you for your post.

    Jim
     

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